Skip to main content

Train’s Biggest Billboard Hot 100 Hits

In honor of Train frontman Patrick Monahan's birthday (Feb. 28), Billboard takes a look at the band's successful track record on the Billboard Hot 100, among other charts.

In honor of Train frontman Pat Monahan‘s birthday (Feb. 28), Billboard takes a look at the band’s successful track record on the Billboard Hot 100, among other charts.

Train arrived on the Oct. 9, 1999-dated Hot 100 chart with “Meet Virginia,” which would peak at No. 20 in January 2000. The pop-rock band has notched eight total top 40 hits on the Hot 100, including three top 10s: “Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me)” (No. 5, 2001), “Hey, Soul Sister” (No. 3, 2010) and “Drive By” (No. 10, 2012).

Related

Train has also repeatedly rumbled onto the Billboard 200 albums chart, having placed 12 titles on the tally, including six top 10s. The band’s highest-charting album, California 37, hit No. 4 in 2012. Its latest, A Girl A Bottle A Boat, debuted at its No. 8 peak on Feb. 18. The new LP features lead single “Play That Song,” which has become Train’s 14th top 10 on the Adult Pop Songs airplay chart. (As a soloist, Monahan added his own Adult Pop Songs top 10, the No. 9-peaking “Her Eyes,” in 2007.)

The band has been nominated for eight Grammy Awards and won two, for “Jupiter” in 2002 for best rock song and best instrumental arrangement accompanying vocalist(s), and for its live recording of “Sister” in 2011 for best pop performance by a duo or group with vocals.

Train’s Biggest Billboard Hot 100 Hits

1, “Hey, Soul Sister” (No. 3 peak, April 10, 2010)
2, “Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me)” (No. 5, June 23, 2001)
3, “Drive By” (No. 10, May 26, 2012)
4, “Calling All Angels” (No. 19, Sept. 13, 2003)
5, “Meet Virginia” (No. 20, Jan. 22, 2000)

Train’s Biggest Billboard Hot 100 hits chart is based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100, through the March 4, 2017, ranking. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least. Due to changes in chart methodology over the years, eras are weighted to account for different chart turnover rates over various periods.