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Paul McCartney Has a Movie Coming to Netflix

McCartney's 2005 novel is being adapted by Netflix and Gaumont into an animated film following the adventures of an imaginative teenage squirrel Wirral.

Paul McCartney‘s 2005 children’s adventure novel, High in the Clouds, will be adapted by Netflix and Gaumont as an animated feature film. The story follows an imaginative teenage squirrel named Wirral who falls in with a group of teen rebels who live in the sky and are led by the tyrannical Gretsch the owl, a teriffic singer who steals the voice of anyone who upstages her.

The film will be directed by Oscar-nominee Timothy Reckart (Head Over Heels), with a screenplay by Jon Croker (Paddington) and original songs and music by McCartney. 

“We are thrilled to be partnering with Netflix. They complement what is already an amazing team with Gaumont and we can think of no-one better to be working with to bring our film to a global audience,” said McCartney in a statement about adapting the book he wrote with Philip Ardagh, with illustrations by Geoff Dunbar. “I’ve always loved animated films and this is a hugely important passion project for me. I can’t wait for the world to see it.”

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French producer Gaumont, the oldest film company in the world, is behind such series as Narcos, F is For Family and Tin Star. “The development of HIGH IN THE CLOUDS has been a fantastic journey working together with Tim and Jon and of course my amazing Gaumont Animation and Family team, Terry Kalagian and Alex Soto,” said Nicolas Atlan, President Gaumont Animation and Family.

“We feel fortunate as this has been an extremely collaborative creative process with the incomparable Paul McCartney and his team, including Lee Eastman who has offered invaluable guidance throughout the development stage. We at Gaumont are elated to be announcing this project and are excited to be working with Melissa Cobb, Gregg Taylor and the talented team at Netflix to be able to share this truly special musical animated feature film with audiences around the world.”