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John Boulos, Veteran Radio Promotion Exec, Leaving Atlantic Records

After 11 years, Roadrunner and Atlantic Records SVP Promotion John Boulos is leaving the company. The veteran radio promotion exec announced the news on Monday in a letter to label staff, thanking…

After 11 years, Roadrunner and Atlantic Records SVP Promotion John Boulos is leaving the company.

The veteran radio promotion exec announced the news on Monday (July 9) in a letter to label staff, thanking company execs and teasing his next move — without revealing what it will be. 

Boulos said he will stay with Atlantic until the end of September.    

“After a lot of thought and consideration, I have decided that as of September 30th, I will be leaving the company to pursue my next big adventure,” he said in his letter. “In a long career that has taken me through a lot of fantastic labels, I can say that the past 11 years here at Atlantic have been truly the most incredible. I have watched us grow into the top label in the business with the best executives and staff, and of course, the most amazing artists. I want to thank Craig Kallman, Julie Greenwald and Mike Easterlin for allowing me to join them on this journey.”

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Boulos, a New York-native, began his career in the mailroom at London Records by day in the 1970s and at night promoted club DJs during the city’s booming dance era. He went on to hold roles at over a dozen companies, also including PolyGram, Warner, Vanguard, Virgin, Epic and Capitol, among others. 

He continued in his letter, “I now look forward to the next challenge, a new chance to build something unforgettable. After working at 12 companies in this amazing business, I am excited for lucky number 13, wherever that may be.”

In 2016, Boulos spoke to Billboard about the importance of radio, even in the streaming era. He said, “[Radio] is the most important, critical component inside the company. Every meeting with managers, they want radio, they want radio, they want radio. And the fact of the matter is when we get radio, we have successes. When we don’t, we’re not economically successful.”