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French Connection: Deezer Aligns With France’s Top Music Retailer

Paris-based streaming service Deezer has partnered with France's leading music retailer Fnac-Darty, as it looks to strengthen its hold on the European music market.

Paris-based streaming service Deezer has partnered with France’s leading music retailer Fnac-Darty, as it looks to strengthen its hold on the European music market. The deal was confirmed in a statement by Deezer CEO Alexis de Gémini, who called it “excellent news for Deezer and Fnac, for market players, and for music fans everywhere.”

Described as a “long term international strategic alliance” the partnership will see Fnac-Darty offer its customers special offers on Deezer subscriptions, as well as see the two businesses co-promote festivals and music events.

Deezer will also push Fnac’s concert ticket service to its users, while visitors to the retailer’s brick and mortar stores will be able to listen to music before purchasing via in-store players linked to Deezer and the Fnac and Darty websites.

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Due to begin at an unspecified date in the second half of this year, Fnac’s own ‘Jukebox’ streaming service will be closed within the next three months with Deezer set to adopt its subscribers. As part of the deal, Fnac retains the option to become a shareholder in Deezer.

Trading in nine European counties, Fnac Darty has 455 stores in France — specializing in entertainment and leisure products and consumer electronics — and runs the second most visited e-commerce site in France, with more than 13 million unique visitors per month across its two retail sites: fnac.com and darty.com. The company reported revenues of €7.4 billion ($7.8 billion) in 2016. Universal Music Group parent company Vivendi is a shareholder.

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Deezer, which is available in more than 180 countries worldwide, including the U.S., and has offices in London, Berlin and Miami alongside its Paris HQ, claims to have over 10 million active users. In January last year, it raised €100 million ($106 million) from investors led by Len Blavatnik‘s Access Industries to fund marketing and the development of new features. The company put its IPO plans on hold in late 2015 after Pandora’s market value took a dive.