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‘Deadpool’ Triggers Chart Gains for DMX, Salt-N-Pepa, Teamheadkick & Juice Newton

The release of Deadpool, the anti-hero comic book flick starring Ryan Reynolds, on Feb. 12 ignites gains on Billboard charts for multiple tracks featured in the movie. DMX re-enters the Hot R&B/Hip-Ho…

The release of Deadpool, the anti-hero comic book flick starring Ryan Reynolds, on Feb. 12 ignites gains on Billboard charts for multiple tracks featured in the movie.

DMX re-enters the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart (dated March 5) at No. 23 with “X Gon’ Give It to Ya,” a track prominent in the movie’s trailer. The cut bests its previous No. 32 peak in 2003. The majority of points bringing the song back onto the chart stem from a 403 percent rise in sales to 26,000 downloads sold, according to Nielsen Music, while its streams soar by 104 percent to 2.6 million U.S. clicks.

Salt-N-Pepa’s “Shoop,” which plays in one of the first scenes of the film (as Deadpool‘s title character gleefully prepares to kill his rivals) and during the closing credits, debuts at No. 19 on R&B/Hip-Hop Digital Songs (18,000, up 823 percent) and zooms by 336 percent to 905,000 streams. “Shoop” topped Hot Rap Songs for five weeks, and peaked at No. 3 on Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs, in 1993.

Teamheadkick’s “Deadpool Rap” bows at No. 26 on Rap Digital Songs (11,000 sold), earning the duo its first Billboard chart appearance. The track was originally released in 2013 in response to the Deadpool video game by the comical rap act that refers to itself as “the original video game band.” The pair has released songs with humorous commentary on a variety of video games, including Titanfall and Assasin’s Creed.

Meanwhile, stepping beyond hip-hop, Deadpool opens to the sounds of Juice Newton’s “Angel of the Morning,” synched to parodied credits (including “Directed by an Overpaid Tool” and starring “A Moody Teen”), juxtaposed with images of the film’s star in the middle of an explosive action sequence frozen in time. The song from country icon Newton debuts at No. 47 on Country Digital Songs (5,000, up 817 percent). It peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100, and No. 22 on Hot Country Songs, in 1981.