-- Live Nation will get a second ruling from the UK's Competition Committee as early as next week, reports Bloomberg. The Ticketmaster-Live Nation merger was first approved by anti-trust regulators in December, but a tribunal ordered a review of the case following an appeal by CTS Eventim AG, a competing ticketing company. The committee has not given any indication of what steps or concessions it would seek to approve the merger. (Bloomberg)

-- Digital distributor IODA has teamed with Amazon.com for a worldwide digital exclusive sale of Kris Kristofferson's "Please Don't Tell Me How The Story Ends: The Publishing Demos, 1968-72." The title is being released by Light in the Attic Records. Amazon.com's exclusive goes through May 11. But the exclusive is good for downloads only as NPR.org is streaming the album in its entirety. (Press release)

-- Ronald A. Cass, former commissioner and vice chairman of the US International Trade Commission, penned a commentary at Forbes.com that looks at Viacom's piracy lawsuit against Google and its lasting impacts. Google, he writes, was aware of YouTube's "massive copyright violations" and had "easy, cost-efficient ways of monitoring them." That puts Google in danger for both property and liability claims, he says. And while some parties insist Google is protected by DMCA safe harbors, Cass argues the service provider is in a better position to detect infringement. Requiring a take-down notice for every infringement, he said, would effectively change the DMCA law. As for the effects of this case, Cass concludes: "The impact of this suit will go well beyond Viacom and Google. Secure property rights and liability rules for IP will support continued investment in developing the shows and other content that have been the engines powering Internet sites like YouTube. Absolving site operators from liability for ignoring rampant piracy would be a recipe for putting the Internet under a cloud of creative uncertainty that will chill investment the way clouds of ash from Eyjafjallajokull's eruption have chilled travel." (Forbes.com, via Music Tech Policy)

-- The Android Market now has 50,000 apps. Nearly 9,400 new titles were added in April after 8,600 new apps were added in March and 5,500 in February. (Androlib, via Gizmodo)