The Motion Picture Assn. of America (MPAA) is extending its public education campaign against movie piracy. Anti-piracy ads will be featured in daily newspapers and consumer magazines across the Unite

LOS ANGELES -- The Motion Picture Assn. of America (MPAA) is extending its public education campaign against movie piracy.

Anti-piracy ads will be featured in daily newspapers and consumer magazines across the United States, as well as in more than 100 college newspapers. The MPAA will also work with about 120 universities on self-enforcing codes of conduct for student computer use on campuses.

Additionally, the MPAA will spearhead outreach programs to parents, students and local groups to explain why movie downloading is illegal, and how it impacts jobs and the economy.

Other education efforts will include working with Junior Achievement -- an organization that informs kids about free enterprise, business and economics -- to teach more than 1 million children in grades five through nine about copyrights.

The MPAA will also work with technology and consumer electronics companies to develop new solutions to illegal downloading.

These efforts add to the MPAA's existing program, which includes running anti-piracy trailers in movie theaters nationwide.