FCC Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein says payola is "alive and well in TV and radio journalism," as well as in the relationship between recording artists and radio programmers. He made this charge duri

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- FCC Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein says payola is "alive and well in TV and radio journalism," as well as in the relationship between recording artists and radio programmers. He made this charge during his comments on a presentation made at the FCC's Jan. 13 Open Meeting.

Adelstein mentioned reporters in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., "uncovering material about payola" and said these new reports are "just like in days of old."

He called on the FCC to investigate recently reported charges of payola.

Adelstein told Billboard Radio Monitor that broadcasters have a duty to "engage in reasonable diligence" to prevent payola.

"The statute says that any station has to engage in reasonable diligence to ensure that anybody that it's putting on the air, either its own employees or anybody that it's dealing with in direct contact, are not being paid in order to put particular types of news or music on the airwaves" without proper disclosure, he said. That meansthat "broadcasters have an obligation to ensure that payola isn't occurring, to anybody that they're putting on the airwaves."

Adelstein also told Monitor that, in meeting with the public on his field trips around the country, he has heard of "numerous allegations" of payola, involving artists and radio airplay.