Backbeat: L.A. Listening Party for David Lynch's New Album Is Kinda Creepy
Backbeat: L.A. Listening Party for David Lynch's New Album Is Kinda Creepy

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Keeping it Creepy: David Lynch unveiled his first solo album "Crazy Clown Time" at L.A.'s Soho House last night. (Photo: Mark Berry)

David Lynch can still attract a crowd at a movie theater, even if he is not showing anything visual.

At the L.A. branch of the Soho House Monday, Lynch unveiled his first solo album, "Crazy Clown Time," since launching his own music company last year, staging its presentation in a coldly eerie manner that could have been a scene in "Inland Empire" or "Mulholland Drive."

The gathering, which attracted about 40 people, most of them members of the media, was held in a the Soho House's posh screening room, an easy chair, table and foot stool for every visitor that made socializing during the playback impossible. Lynch introduced the album, due out Nov. 8, standing in near darkness and with the reverb on the microphone turned up to 11. He gave credit to his collaborator Big Dean Henry and turned over the event to two models, Jacqueline and Cassie, to introduce the songs. The two young ladies entered and exited through a side door between cuts; one held up a placard with the number of the track and the other delivered the song title. No one else spoke. The lights went down and per Soho House policy, attendees were informed no photos, no recordings, no cell phones.

The cover of the album -- a black and white photograph of a right hand with a dark orange die placed at the top of the palm -- sat still on the movie screen while the 14 songs played. Beyond the fact that Karen O sang on the lead-off track "Pinkie's Dream," no other credits were given. The music, not surprising, shared many elements with the scores of Angelo Badalamenti, Lynch's cinematic music collaborator -- big echoey guitars, natural and electronic percussion and heavy atmospherics. Instrumentals "The Night Bell," and "These are My Friends" harkened back to Lynch's TV show "Twin Peaks;" and not surprisingly, a few pieces were more spoken word than singing, the delivery off-the-wall and the stories slightly creepy.

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Sherlyn Fenn as Twin Peaks' Audrey Horne is part of the rotating backdrop to the song "Audry's Prayer" by Angelo Baldementi and David Lynch on www.davidlynch.com

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