John Geils of the J. Geils Band perform on stage in June 1972 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

John Geils of the J. Geils Band perform on stage in June 1972 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Jorgen Angel/Redferns

J. Geils, founder and longtime guitarist of the J. Geils Band, was found dead in his Groton, Massachusetts, home on Tuesday (April 11), police confirmed. He was 71 years old.

The J. Geils Band -- fronted by singer Peter Wolf -- made their Billboard chart debut on Jan. 30, 1971, when their eponymous album entered the Billboard 200. The group would eventually rack up 15 charting sets on the tally, including the No. 1 album Freeze-Frame, which collected four weeks atop the list in 1982.

The Freeze-Frame set launched the act’s biggest hit single, the Grammy Award-nominated “Centerfold,” which spent six weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1982. The album spun off two more charting singles: the No. 4-peaking title track and “Angel in Blue,” which reached No. 40.

J. Geils Band was so popular in 1982, the Freeze-Frame album finished at No. 5 on Billboard’s year-end Top Pop Albums chart, while “Centerfold” was the year’s No. 5 Top Pop Single. “Centerfold” was also the No. 11 biggest Hot 100 hit of the 1980s.

“Centerfold” ranks at No. 1 on the band’s top 10 biggest Billboard Hot 100 hits, followed by “Freeze-Frame.” The 1975 hit “Must of Got Lost” rounds out their top three tunes.

Here are J. Geils Band’s top 10 biggest Billboard Hot 100 hits:

Rank, Title, Hot 100 Peak Position, Peak Date
1. “Centerfold,” No. 1 (six weeks), Feb. 6, 1982

2. “Freeze-Frame,” No. 4, April 10, 1982
3. “Must of Got Lost,” No. 12, Jan. 4, 1975
4. “Give It to Me,” No. 30, June 23, 1973
5. “I Do,” No. 24, Jan. 8, 1983
6. “One Last Kiss,” No. 35, Feb. 3, 1979
7. “Come Back,” No. 32, March 22, 1980
8. “Love Stinks,” No. 38, May 31, 1980

9. “Angel in Blue,” No. 40, July 3, 1982
10. “Looking for a Love,” No. 39, Jan. 15, 1972  

The J. Geils Band’s top 10 Billboard Hot 100 hits chart is based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100, through the April 22, 2017, ranking. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least. Due to changes in chart methodology over the years, certain eras are weighted to account for different chart turnover rates over various periods.