The Bee Gees photographed on Oct. 22, 1977 in Los Angeles.

The Bee Gees photographed on Oct. 22, 1977 in Los Angeles. 

Ed Caraeff/Getty Images

Despite being thousands of miles from home, Australian artists have always found a warm welcome on the U.S. Billboard charts. Superstars from Down Under have flown up the charts on countless occasions, bringing a savvy mix of pop and rock smashes to American audiences. In the past several decades, Aussie acts have earned a compelling portfolio of No. 1 songs and albums and established several chart records as they've taken the U.S. (and the world) by storm.

As the 2017 Australian Open heads into its final matches in Melbourne this weekend, Billboard has partnered with Tennis Channel to present the top 25 songs of all time on the Billboard Hot 100 by Australian-bred or -raised acts in lead roles.

Olivia-Newton John claims the No. 1 Hot 100 title of all time by an Australian with "Physical." The song, released in 1981, exploded on the U.S. charts and, at the time, its 10-week domination tied the mark for the longest-running No. 1 single (with Debby Boone's "You Light Up My Life" from 1977), which was not surpassed until 1992. The smash became the top Billboard song of 1982 and later the biggest Hot 100 hit of the entire 1980s. Its runaway success -- and don't forget its pop-culture staple music video, featuring Newton-John working her way to early-era MTV exposure -- added a new layer to her pop stardom after prior successes on both the pop and country charts.

Just below, runners-up the Bee Gees post eight titles of the top 25 Hot 100 hits by Australians, more than any other act. The trio -- brothers Maurice, Barry and Robin Gibb (born in England and raised in Australia, before moving back to England) -- earned its first chart-topper in 1971, but hit its stride with the soundtrack to 1977's Saturday Night Fever. The phenomenon powered three No. 1 hits for the siblings, and their songs were instrumental to the soundtrack becoming the top Billboard pop album of 1978 and snagging the Grammy for album of the year.

Another Gibb, brother Andy Gibb, wraps the top three with "I Just Want to Be Your Everything." Although the Bee Gees' younger brother's chart career was confined to a period of just more than five years (1977-81), he secured a mighty run, scoring three No. 1s in the period and a further three trips to the top 10. Not to be outdone by his older brothers, Andy also earned a year-end No. 1 song in 1978: His "Shadow Dancing" slipped right by the Bee Gees' "Night Fever," which ranked at No. 2.

Australian acts continued to find the Hot 100's summit in the 1990s and 2000s, while they have been responsible for some of the biggest hits of the current decade. Gotye's "Somebody That I Used to Know," featuring Kimbra, which places at No. 4 on the list, was a top record for both consumers and critics, earning honors as 2012's top Hot 100 song (after spending eight weeks at No. 1) and the Grammy for record of the year. Iggy Azalea's "Fancy" (featuring British singer-songwriter Charli XCX) served up seven weeks on top in 2014, and, most recently, prolific pop singer-songwriter Sia (with Jamaican Sean Paul) further added to Australians' legacy atop the Hot 100 when "Cheap Thrills" (No. 24 on the list below) ascended to No. 1 for four weeks in 2016.

Check out the list below to see which songs bested their competition and completed memorable runs to the top.

All-Time Top 25 Songs by Australian Acts on the Billboard Hot 100:
Rank, Song Title, Artist,
Hot 100 Peak Position, Peak Date

25. “You Should Be Dancing” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (one week), Peak Date: Sept. 4, 1976

24. “Cheap Thrills” – Sia featuring Sean Paul
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (four weeks), Peak Date: Aug. 6, 2016

23. “Who Can It Be Now?” – Men at Work
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (one week), Peak Date: Oct. 30, 1982

22. “Love So Right” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 3, Peak Date: Nov. 20, 1976

21. “All Out of Love” – Air Supply
Hot 100 Peak: No. 2, Peak Date: Sept. 13, 1980

20. “Too Much Heaven” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (two weeks), Peak Date: Jan. 6, 1979

19. “Delta Dawn” – Helen Reddy
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (one week), Peak Date: Sept. 15, 1973

18. “Don’t Talk to Strangers” – Rick Springfield
Hot 100 Peak: No. 2, Peak Date: May 22, 1982

17. “Jive Talkin’” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (two weeks), Peak Date: Aug. 9, 1975

16. “How Can You Mend A Broken Heart” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (four weeks), Peak Date: Aug. 7, 1971

15. “Need You Tonight” – INXS
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (one week), Peak Date: Jan. 30, 1988

14. “Magic” – Olivia Newton-John
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (four weeks), Peak Date: Aug. 2, 1980

13. “Fancy” – Iggy Azalea featuring Charli XCX
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (seven weeks), Peak Date: June 7, 2014

12. “I Knew I Loved You” – Savage Garden
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (four weeks), Peak Date: Jan. 29, 2000

11. “(Love Is) Thicker Than Water” – Andy Gibb
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (two weeks), Peak Date: March 4, 1978

10. “Down Under” – Men at Work
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (four weeks), Peak Date: Jan. 15, 1983

9. “Jessie’s Girl” – Rick Springfield
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (two weeks), Peak Date: Aug. 1, 1981

8. “Stayin’ Alive” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (four weeks), Peak Date: Feb. 4, 1978

7. “Shadow Dancing” – Andy Gibb
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (seven weeks), Peak Date: June 17, 1978

6. “Night Fever” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (eight weeks), Peak Date: March 18, 1978

5. “Truly Madly Deeply” – Savage Garden
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (two weeks), Peak Date: Jan. 17, 1998

4. “Somebody That I Used to Know” – Gotye featuring Kimbra
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (eight weeks), Peak Date: April 28, 2012

3. “I Just Want To Be Your Everything” – Andy Gibb
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (four weeks), Peak Date: July 30, 1977

2. “How Deep Is Your Love” – Bee Gees
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (three weeks), Peak Date: Dec. 24,1977

1. “Physical” – Olivia Newton-John
Hot 100 Peak: No. 1 (10 weeks), Peak Date: Nov. 21, 1981

The chart’s rankings are based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100, from the chart’s inception in August of 1958 through the Dec. 24, 2016, ranking. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least. Due to changes in chart methodology over the years, certain eras are weighted to account for different chart turnover rates over various periods.