Privacy
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Spotify co-founder and CEO Daniel Ek has again taken to the company's blog to address the company's privacy policy, which drew considerable criticism two weeks ago after the company updated the policy's terms.

Following Ek's declaration of his intent to do "a better job in communicating what these policies mean and how any information you choose to share will -- and will not -- be used," Spotify has rewritten its privacy policy in plainer language, doing its best to avoid resembling end-user license agreements like that of iTunes, which includes aggressively formatted and worded passages like:

YOU EXPRESSLY ACKNOWLEDGE AND AGREE THAT, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, USE OF THE APPLE SOFTWARE AND ANY SERVICES PERFORMED BY OR ACCESSED THROUGH THE APPLE SOFTWARE IS AT YOUR SOLE RISK AND THAT THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO SATISFACTORY QUALITY, PERFORMANCE, ACCURACY AND EFFORT IS WITH YOU.

Most of Spotify's new policy is unsurprising, giving the company the right to use information you provide it in order for it to provide you with music to listen to. For example, the company's licenses to play songs are geographically dependent, so the company must know where in the world, generally, you are.

The privacy terms likely to most rankle its readers (of which there are probably few, even if it is now relatively digestible) and its signees are those that address advertisements and cookies.

We may allow our business partners to use cookies on or outside the Spotify Service for... collecting information about your online activities over time and across different websites. We may also use service providers acting on our behalf to use cookies for the purposes identified above.

On widgets, such as Spotify's website-embeddable player:

We know when you interact with a widget, and websites containing the widgets may receive this information.

And, on the company's information gathering:

... to ensure technical functionality of the Service, develop new products and services, and analyse your use of the Service, including your interaction with applications, advertising, products, and services that are made available, linked to, or offered through the Service.

Even information-sharing provisions like these aren't likely to raise many eyebrows in the year 2015 -- the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies. The oft-quoted maxim "if you're not paying for it, you're the product" has never been more true than now. Facebook's terms of service make it clear that anything you post to the site, whether a photo of your face or an original drawing, is subject to "a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use" that content. A billion people were on that site this past Monday -- so the likelihood that Spotify's new privacy policy will deter anyone besides Notch seems... remote.