Living Colour's Vernon Reid, Corey Glover & Black Rock Coalition Celebrate '30 Years in 30 Days'

Sean Jamar
Vernon Reid and Corey Glover from the Black Rock Coalition 30th Anniversary Kick-Off Party on Sept. 6, 2015.

Living Colour’s Vernon Reid and Corey Glover will be among the special guests playing tribute to Jimi Hendrix and his group Band of Gypsys this Friday and Saturday. The two-night event at Brooklyn’s BAMcafé -- also featuring the BRC Orchestra --  is part of the Black Rock Coalition’s 30th anniversary celebration, “30 Years in 30 Days.”

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Upcoming events during the BRC’s month-long September celebration include a master vocal clinic with Glover and others at Brooklyn’s Willie Mae Music Lab (Sept. 20) and the “Million Man Mosh” at Baltimore’s The Windup Space (Sept. 27), featuring sets by rockers Tamar-kali, Thaylo Bleu and Throwdown Syndicate. Among the preceding festivities: a new music listening party, a bowl-a-thon fundraiser for scholarships on behalf of the Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls and “National Support Black Rock Night” concerts in New York City and Chicago.

“This celebration is a concentration of what we do throughout the year,” says BRC national president LaRonda Davis. She cites such ongoing BRC initiatives as indie talent showcases, educational clinics and providing free rehearsal space for musician members and friends. Also part of that mix is the BRC Orchestra, whose most recent stint was a six-city tour in France this past May. On Sept. 25, the submissions process will open for volume three of BRC Records’ Rock ‘N’ Roll Reparations album series. Slated for release this December, it will join the indie label’s seven previous compilations.

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Launched in 1985, New York-based BRC is a non-profit member-supported organization dedicated to the development, exposure and support of black alternative music. The BRC board of directors includes founding members Reid and Burnt Sugar leader Greg Tate.

“On the one hand,” says Davis, “it’s about reclaiming our heritage and our cultural contributions. On the other, it’s about supporting artists who are trying to move the culture forward by tapping into that. Rather than complain about lack of industry support -- ‘We don’t know where to put you so we can’t play or sell you’ -- we started BRC to support artists who are going outside of expectations to say something people aren’t already hearing. It’s all for the love.”