Tyler Farr Goes From Bro to Brooding on Sophomore Album ‘Suffer in Peace’: Album Review

Tyler Farr
Country
4
<p>In country songwriting, fighting words are often leavened with robust wit. It couldn't have been lost on <a href="/artist/430644/tyler-farr/chart">Tyler Farr</a> that his first big hit, 2013's cheater-­confronting "Redneck Crazy," came off more menacing than amusing. But he's found an artful way to expand beyond both that song and the hip-hop-cribbing flirtations on his debut LP of the same name. If he was ever viewed as bro country, the brooding performances on <em>Suffer in Peace</em> will change that.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.billboard.com/articles/review/6546316/tyler-farr-nyc-concert-irving-plaza-live-review">Tyler Farr Bares Country's Rough Edges at Irving Plaza: Live Review</a></p><p>"The joke's on me, and it ain't funny" are the first words of self-depreciating single "A Guy Walks Into a Bar." The title track is a confession of a man looking to hole up and nurse his wounds; power ballad "I Don't Even Want This Beer" is about self-medicating with the bottle. There's meaty ­material here, and Farr lands plenty of gut punches with it, playing up his voice's graininess and then deftly softening it with vulnerable inflections. Along with moments devoted to sentimentality and rural pride, it all adds up to one of country's richer portraits of masculinity in recent memory.</p><p><em>This story originally appeared in the <a href="http://shop.billboard.com/products/billboard-back-issue-volume-127-issue-13">May 9&nbsp;issue of Billboard</a>.&nbsp;</em></p>