'13 Reasons Why': Watch the Teaser for Season 2 of the Controversial Netflix Drama

Beth Dubber/Netflix
Dylan Minnette in 13 Reasons Why.

The streaming giant has also set a May 18 return for the sophomore season of the teen suicide drama.

More than year after its controversial first season, Netflix has unveiled a first look and premiere date for the second season of 13 Reasons Why

The Brian Yorkey drama, which drew criticism for its brutal depiction of teen suicide, will debut its second season on May 18, with Netflix also unspooling a first look at the unexpected second season of the series starring Dylan Minnette and Katherine Langford.

The 13-episode second season will follow the Liberty High characters as they cope with the aftermath of their classmate Hannah Baker's (Langford) suicide. The first season revolved around the 13 cassette tapes that she left in her wake, each providing new clues and perspectives into why she ended up taking her life.

The first look (watch in the video player, above) reveals polaroids to be the new technology in season two. The video shows several of the castmembers, along with polaroids revealing a darker peek at what's to come. Several characters are warned to keep their mouths shut ahead of the looming trial between Hannah's parents and the school district — Jessica Davis (Alisha Boe) and school guidance counselor Kevin Porter (Derek Luke) rather explicitly.

Bryce Walker (Justin Prentice), however, is shown relaxing with new character Chloe (Anne Winters), the "It girl" and head cheerleader at Liberty High. Meanwhile, Hannah's mother Olivia Baker (Kate Walsh) is attempting to put the pieces together on her own investigative bulletin board.

At the end of the video, Clay Jensen (Minnette) is shown picking up a picture of Hannah that carries with it this warning on the back: "The tapes were just the beginning." Earlier in the day, the show's Twitter account hinted that something was coming with a video of a polaroid that read, "The truth is developing."

Season two picks up in the aftermath of Hannah's death and the start of the characters' complicated journeys toward healing and recovery, according to Netflix. Liberty High prepares to go on trial, but someone will stop at nothing to keep the truth surrounding Hannah's death concealed. A series of ominous polaroids lead Clay and his classmates to uncover a sickening secret and a conspiracy to cover it up.

The cliffhanger finale left many of the characters' arcs up in the air. Among them, Jessica was coming to terms with her sexual assault, while Alex Standal's (Miles Heizer) life was left hanging in the balance after his own suicide attempt. The end of the season also identified Tyler Down (Devin Druid) as a potential school shooter and revealed Bryce to be the person who raped Hannah and Jessica.

The second season, which will go beyond the content of Jay Asher's best-selling book on which the series was based, will continue to feature Hannah, though she will no longer be the drama's lone narrator. Unlike season one, there will not be any tapes guiding the story this time around when it picks up months after season one.

"I'm curious to know how Clay has coped the last few months," Minnette previously told THR. "Did he find closure? Is he moving on? Part of me wonders if he'll be able to escape his anxiety, but I doubt it because that would make for compelling storytelling if he still has anxiety."

Following the backlash to season one, the team behind 13 Reasons Why added trigger warnings, including a video from the cast, and launched an online hub of resources ahead of season two. 

"That was our mission from the very first moment," series creator Yorkey said. "From the beginning, we knew that we had to tell the stories as honestly as we could, that we had to portray these characters and the things that they go through with as much authenticity as we could bring to it, and especially that these tough topics deserved the most honestly in order to make something that teens would look at and recognize in this show their lives, themselves, people that they know and things they are going through."

This article was originally published by The Hollywood Reporter.