Watch Billy Porter Give a Master Class On How to Make an Entrance

Terence Patrick/CBS
Billy Porter on The Late Late Show with James Corden on Sept. 18, 2019.

New rule for late night television: Billy Porter should be on call to simply walk on to every show from now on. 

On Wednesday night (Sept. 18), Porter appeared on The Late Late Show with James Corden, and he showed every future guest the proper way to make an entrance. Emerging in a gold lamé cape and a sparkling purple gown, the star luxuriated in the audience's adoration -- and then turned backstage, only to emerge again with a costume change, now wearing a long golden robe with a bouquet of roses, which he passed out to the audience. 

The star didn't stop there -- as a flummoxed Corden begged Porter to come sit on the couch and kick off the show, the Pose star jumped on stage with the Reggie Watts-led house band for an energetic tambourine solo. Once he was finished, Porter climbed onto a platform being carried by two shirtless men, where he was carried to the couch, and finally sat down. 

In the bit, Corden feigned fury, as he lambasted the star for wasting precious air time on his grand entrance, as Porter apologized profusely. Eventually, Corden asked him to leave, as an indignant Porter proclaimed, "Don't you worry about it ... it's all good, fine James!" and stormed off of the set. 

But the best had yet to come. As Corden began his solo interview with fellow guest Kirsten Dunst, a strain of notes interrupted her first answer, as Porter emerged with a full set and crew of dancers, singing along to Gloria Gaynor's iconic classic "I Will Survive" directly to Corden. As rollerskaters, a disco ball and a giant confetti canon filled the screen, Corden finally gave up and sent the show to a commercial break.

Check out the full clip of Porter's legendary entrance below:

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