JD Samson's Pride Month Playlist: Katy Perry, Culture Club, Gossip & More

JD Samson
Matthew Eisman/WireImage

JD Samson

As part of our 30 Days of Pride initiative, we've asked LGBTQ stars to create playlists to show what "pride" means to them. JD Samson curated a list based on songs that remind her of queer history and punk politics.

Give JD Samson's playlist a spin below, and read why she chose each track.

1. Sylvester - "Do You Wanna Funk?"
I see this song as a historical reference of where we have come from. The joy of dancing as freedom to be exactly who we are and the ability to relax in that sentiment and be saved by the music.

2. Inner City - "Good Life"
Pride has always been a moment for me to appreciate how lucky I am to have a community of people that love to dance and appreciate what we have ... not what we don't have. This song always makes me feel lucky to be part of such a colorful community of people that have come together by chance, but stay together for a reason.

3. The Trammps (Joey Negro Remix) - "Can We Come Together"
With the connection and appreciation of the community of course comes some backlash and important. In recent years, I have seen separations within the LGBTQI world, and this track always gives me hope that we can be a bunch of identities that come together for this moment of the year to appreciate each other. 

4. Deodato - "Keep It in the Family"
I'm a disco nut and Pride is the perfect place to play it. The queer history of disco is no surprise to anyone who knows anything about music, and I love staying true to our roots whenever I can. No matter what the millennials say, I'm gonna get historical whenever possible and our common fight. 

5. Carl Bean - "I Was Born This Way"
Nothing against Lady Gaga's version of this song that graced the charts for months a few years back, but I do like to give credit where credit is due and create awareness around the track released by Motown in 1975. 

6. Katy Perry - "Chained to the Rhythm"
I don't know why I am putting this here, except for the fact that I love this song and I believe the idea of being "chained" to an identity that is prescribed by our society is something that we ALL have to deal with, within whatever structure of our lifestyles it may be. This song to me represents the acknowledgement of the heteronormativity of our culture and the recognition that we can push through that and get more punk again. 

7. Gossip - "Heavy Cross"
This track is one of my favorite tracks ever. It encapsulates so much about growing up queer. The song references the idea of religion coming up against sexuality and a queer identity, as well as the idea of togetherness and love between two people. When I play this song I usually come out in the front of the stage and sing it to the audience. "It takes two. It's up to me and you to prove it." Me and the audience. Us.

8. Joe Smooth - "Promised Land"
This 1988 house track really spoke to the idea that people should unite together as a family, so that we can all move forward into peace and harmony. I love this track and think it represents so much of what house music has done for our community and the roots of where we came from and where we are going.

9. Culture Club - "Karma Chameleon"
This track is about being real. Being who you are and not being afraid of that. The idea that if you aren't ... things are gonna blow up in your face. We can take this to mean a lot of things, but for me, I always thought of it to mean that I should be ME, whatever that meant, and the gift I would receive is joy and pride. 

10. X-Ray Spex - "Oh Bondage! Up Yours!"
This feminist anthem is perfect for the intersectional politics of LGBTQI pride. This punk expression of standing up to "The Man" is one of my favorite tracks of all time, and deserves to be around as long as we must tear down the patriarchy. 

Gay Pride Month 2017

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