Chadwick Boseman Celebrates Stan Lee's Life With Musical Performance: Watch

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
Comic book creator Stan Lee, left, shakes hands with Chadwick Boseman, star of "Black Panther," at the premiere of the film at The Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29, 2018 in Los Angeles. 

"That's how I am sending you to the other side," said the "Black Panther" star.

Chadwick Boseman said goodbye to Stan Lee in his own way, with a musical tribute.  In a video he posted on Thursday (Nov. 15) to social media, the Black Panther star played a set of djembe drums for a minute in celebration of the Marvel icon. Lee died Monday at age 95.

"I know how much you loved Joan. The only way we should send you home is to celebrate. @TheRealStanLee #whatalife #missyouonthedocks #missyoubackstage #wakandaforever," Boseman wrote in a tweet that accompanied the video. 

Joan was Lee's late wife, who died July 2017. She was also 95.   

Lee co-created Black Panther in 1966 with Jack Kirby. The character was revolutionary as the first African superhero in mainstream comics. This year's Black Panther film is considered one of the best in all the Marvel franchise. 

After he concluded his performance, Bosman said, "Stan, that's for you. That's how I am sending you to the other side. That's how they will receive you on the other. I love you, man."  In the days since his death, countless fans posted tributes on social media, and numerous actors who have played roles Lee helped create have paid their respects.

In one of his final videos, Lee spoke about how much he loved his fans. "I love my fans," Lee begins. "I cannot tell you how much I love my fans. Sometimes at night, I am sitting here thinking, 'What's it all about?' And then I get a letter from a fan or I read something or I see something or I remember something. And I realize, it's so lucky to have fans, fans who really care about you. That's the reason I care so much about the fans, because they make me feel so great."

He continued, "And there's something, if you think about it, wonderful about someone caring about you — as I care about them — whom you've never met. They may live in another part of the world. But they care and you have something in common. And occasionally you contact each other. But this business of fans I think is terrific, and I love them all."

This article originally appeared on THR.com.


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