CMA Awards 2018

Universal Music's Newest Bet in Brazil, Mahmundi Is Made for the Dance Floor: Interview

Guto Costa
Mahmundi

Brazilian singer and producer Mahmundi recently joined Universal Music, marking the beginning of a new phase for her, in which she is more experienced and conscious of her role.

"I learned how to stand up for myself as a producer, as a woman having to deal with men. It can be the annoying side of the job," the singer told Billboard Brazil.

Mahmundi released her first album, which was self-titled, in 2016. It was well received by the public and critics with a melodic electronic sound, inspired by music of the '80s. Her new album is set to be released in October.

You've just signed with Universal Music, and your new album is set to be released in October. How's this new phase?

I made sure I met everyone working for me: from the girl at the front desk to the finance guy. I needed to know where I was getting myself into and who I was dealing with. Now, occasionally, I stop there for a coffee. Getting to know them made me like the album. Originally, it would have only five tracks. Now, I want to do a full album.

Do you planning to release more singles besides "Imagem"?

Everyone is trying to understand the market, you know? Playlists are huge now. Many friends and producers tell me that studios are always packed because everyone wants to record a single, there's an urgency to communicate. I want to release two more singles before the album release.

This single is made for the dance floor. Do you think about releasing remixes?

Yes, I've been talking to a lot of people who aren't even from my universe. Leo Justi helped me with this track "Imagem." It was a demo from 2013 and sounded more upbeat and funky. I asked him for more melody and he dominates this art. It's even healthier for me. I'm too old to dance funk, trap. 

When we talked before, you had just moved to São Paulo and didn't know if it would influence your sound. Now that you moved back to Rio, it doesn't sound like it did, right?

Living in São Paulo impacted me on a personal level, this thing about music as a profession. And I met so many good people. Pélico, an incredible songwriter, I don't know how he hasn't made it yet. Rico Dalasam, Emicida -- guys that should make music for the entire world to listen, you know?

A lot of people helped me on the professional level, to live from music. You wake up, you go to work, you stop for lunch and then you work again.

I learned how to stand up for myself as a producer, as a woman having to deal with men. It can be the annoying side of the job.