First Spin: The Week's Best New Dance Tracks From Black Coffee & Usher, Riva Starr & More

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Black Coffee

New Music Friday is intense. Hundreds of songs drop from artists around the world, and you're supposed to somehow find the best ones. It's fun work, but it's time-consuming -- so we at Billboard Dance want to give you a hand. Each week, we sift through the streams and dig into the digital crates to present absolute must-hears from the wide breadth of fresh jams.

This week saw a sick Latin crossover from Major Lazer, a club-shaking collab from Jauz and Zeds Dead, a disco remix from Flume and more, but Friday brings yet new flavors you need in your ear. Below, we've got smooth house butter in the form of an iconic collab, a rare lo-fi rhythm, early morning moods and more. 

Black Coffee & Usher - “Lalala”

Grab on to something on the dance floor. This mega-collab is smooth enough to knock you on your knees. South Africa's biggest house star made noise when Drake sampled his rhythm for “Get It Together,” but linking with Usher is his biggest pop crossover to date. Black Coffee brings the depth out of the R&B icon's performance with a delectable groove that takes no milk, only cream. “Lalala” will be stuck in your head all night, and there's nothing wrong with that. -- Kat Bein

Star B (Riva Starr & Mark Broom) - "Gotta Have You"

The first collaboration between Mark Broom and Snatch! Records label boss Riva Starr is self-described "peak time disco," and indeed, we can see ourselves getting fully down on a sweaty dance floor to the soaring, swirling single. "Gotta Have You" packs a lot of punch into a quick three minutes, with an orchestral synth laying the foundation for a soulful vocal sample taken from '70s Detroit funk/soul group Fantastic Four's "Got To Have Your Love." The song is currently getting rinsed by all-stars including Carl Cox, The Martinez Brothers, Pan-Pot, The Black Madonna and Hot Since 82, if you need more evidence as to its quality. But really, just listen. The proof is in the way it makes you move. -- Katie Bain

Jacques Greene - “Do It Without You”

Earlier this week, Canadian producer Jacques Greene announced a new album, Dawn Chorus, due out Oct. 18 on Lucky Me. While a press release previews the LP as featuring more live instrumentation and artist collaboration, its lead single, “Do It Without You,” shows Greene at his sampling best. Spacious and atmospheric, the emotive track is built around its titular vocal sample which twists and turns on a bed of breakbeats, fading in and out like a dream interrupted. A dance floor-worthy track for sure, but one that sounds that you’d instead hear it from outside the club after a long night of partying, ears still ringing and adrenaline pumping, as you duck into dawn’s cold and quiet light. -- Krystal Rodriguez

Hnny - “By”

In 2016, Swedish producer Hnny abruptly canceled hours before his set at a London party thrown by promoters Percolate. He stepped way from DJing and producing indefinitely, citing personal health issues. Three years later, the sample-loving house producer re-emerges with a deliciously jazzy and introspective two-track EP called Hosoi. It's lo-fi sound seems to suspend time, even as the vocal on A-side “By” says otherwise. Hosoi serves as the first release from a new label called Hosoi run by an audiophile bar in Stockholm by the same name. We don't know if this is a sign of more to come from Hnny, but we're thankful for the mood in any case. -- K.Bein

Manic Focus - "Just Like You"

Manic Focus is back with his sixth studio album, Lost In a Digital World, a 12-track LP that delivers more of the hip-hop oriented and often grimy elevated bass music that's kept the Denver-based producer on our radar for years. Standout singles include "Just Like You," a hypnotic call to arms that hits your right in your root chakra. The artist is on tour straight through fall, with dates across North America.

Lxury - “Distance”

After releasing his Movement Design Suite EP in April, South London producer Lxury is back with a new double-single, Joy TV / Distance, in his debut on A-Trak’s Fool’s Gold Records. Whereas “Joy TV” chases euphoria across peaks and valleys, its B-side is a steadier, albeit just as dreamy, affair. Its synth work is luminescent, its strings short and piercing, and its bassline deep but sprightly -- the kind of transitional track that you can put your head down on the dance floor and sidestep to for a while losing track of time.  

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