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Lizzo Feels the Body-Positivity Movement Has Been 'Co-Opted by All Bodies'

Lizzo's long been outspoken about loving your body and normalizing larger shapes, but she's got a gripe with how the body-positivity movement's been going.

"Please use the body positivity movement to empower yourself," she captioned a recent TikTok video on the topic. "But we need to protect and uplift the bodies it was created for and by."

The "Truth Hurts" singer went into detail in her passionate video. "Now that body positivity has been co-opted by all bodies, and people are finally celebrating medium and small girls, and people who occasionally get rolls, fat people are still getting the short end of this movement," she said. "We're still getting s--- on. We're still getting talked about, meme'd, shamed -- and no one cares anymore because it's like, 'Body positivity is for everybody!'"

The artist continued by encouraging everyone to celebrate their bodies and use the movement to feel empowered, but asked that people not forget the origins of body positivity.

"The people who created this movement -- big women, big Brown and Black women, queer women -- are not benefiting from the mainstream success of it," Lizzo shared. "Our bodies are none of your f---ing business. Our health is none of your f---ing business. All we ask is that you keep the same energy with these medium girls that you praise. Keep the same f---ng energy!"

Besides promoting body positivity on social media, the Grammy winner has a new project on her plate to help further her message: She's creating a new reality competition for Amazon. The aim of the show is to find talented full-figured models and dancers to join her on stage.

"Where are all the big girls?" Lizzo asked on Instagram when she announced the program March 19. "That's what I want to know!"

The as-yet-untitled show has already begun the casting process.

Watch Lizzo's video about the body-positivity movement on her TikTok account.

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