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Oyster Kids Turn a Panic Attack Into Upbeat New Single 'Work It Out': Premiere

Oyster Kids
Blake Zimmerman

Oyster Kids

Oyster Kids have been mostly a home recording project for Andrew Eapen out of Yorba Linda, Calif. But after some online success and live dates with Weezer, LCD Soundsystem, Miike Snow and others, Eapen and company are ready to be shucked out with a debut album in 2020 -- whose buoyant "Work It Out" is premiering exclusively below.

"This is all kind of stuff I was finishing up last year and earlier this year and kind of producing at a steady pace," Eapen tells Billboard. "I've been working on music for a long time and I let it sit there for a bit. I never really go into the writing process thinking, 'Alright, I'm gonna write an album.' I just write the songs that I want, and once I feel like there's a common thread with the storyline and I feel like I have a cohesive body of work to put out, I'll do it."

"Work It Out," like Eapen's other songs -- including "Losing My Mind" and "Breathe," released earlier this year -- is "just kind of a snapshot of my life at the time." "Work It Out" was inspired by his first-ever panic attack, and others that followed. "I was just fed up feeling this kind of tension and...dread is the word," explains Eapen, who's also contributed music to TV shows and films such as To All The Boys I've Loved Before, Shameless, Jane The Virgin and more, as well as to podcast soundtracks. "I just wanted to find something that felt good. I got away for a bit and took a mini-vacation to Palm Springs and was laying in the pool, floating on my back and looking up at the sky and felt some sort of peace at that moment.

"So this song is just written about that moment of release and feeling good. I tend to write stuff that's more about my darker feelings and stuff, but this song is uplifting and positive, encapsulating how I felt at that moment."

Eapen says his other Oyster Kids songs "tend to be a lot darker" lyrically, while the music will be "lighter" -- though, he adds, "Work It Out" is the most upbeat of the bunch. But he and his three bandmates are decidedly happy about the prospect of putting out an album and getting on the road to support it.

"It’s been a long time coming," Eapen says. "I think I released my first single as Oyster Kids in 2016, then I took a little break and started doing some composing and co-writing and producing other artists. So I've really jumped back into Oyster Kids and releasing music. It definitely feels good to finally be putting a cohesive body of work out there."