Las Vegas Strip Dims Lights to Mark Anniversary of Route 91 Massacre

ISAAC BREKKEN/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock
People gather to dedicate a healing garden on the first anniversary of the Oct. 1, 2017 Las Vegas shooting, in Las Vegas on Oct. 1,  2018.  

Las Vegas' casinos dimmed their lights and shooting survivors formed a human chain to mark the anniversary of the Oct. 1, 2017, mass shooting that killed 58 people and injured more than 850.

At 10:40 p.m. on Monday, hundreds of survivors of the Las Vegas mass shooting have formed a human chain around the shuttered site of a country music festival where a gunman opened fire last year.

Videos on social media showed the display of solidarity on the Las Vegas Strip started around 10 p.m. That’s around the time the Oct. 1, 2017, shooting began.

As people were linking arms and holding hands Monday night near the concert site, officials and several hundred others across town listened to bagpipes and the names of the 58 victims being read aloud.   

A procession of pickup trucks with American flags flying from their truck beds drove down the Strip around the same time honking their horns.   

Earlier, officials read the names of the 58 people who were killed in last year’s mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip to mark the anniversary of the tragedy.

The names were read before survivors and family members of the victims shortly after 10:05 p.m., the time when the Oct. 1, 2017, shooting on the Las Vegas Strip began.

Monday’s ceremony at a downtown Las Vegas park where trees have been planted for every victim began with two minutes of bagpipes. Candles were also lit to commemorate those killed, and sobs could be heard in the crowd.

Many in attendance were wearing T-shirts and other apparel with the Vegas Strong message that became a rallying cry for the city after the shooting.

At 10:00 p.m., casinos lining the famous Las Vegas Strip have dimmed their glittering lights to mark the first anniversary of a mass shooting at a concert that left 58 dead and hundreds wounded.

The casino lights and famous Welcome to Las Vegas sign were darkened for three minutes starting at 10:01 p.m. — around the time a gunman opened fire from the gold tower of Mandalay Bay hotel across the street from the country music festival.

The shooting is the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The Strip’s bright lights were last dimmed in October 2017, marking a week after the shooting.

The casinos’ marquees also went dark after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in 2001 and to mark the deaths of famous Las Vegas entertainers like Elvis Presley and Frank Sinatra, presidents like Ronald Reagan and local legends like former UNLV basketball coach Jerry Tarkanian.