Every Panic! at the Disco Music Video From 2006 to Today: Watch Their Evolution

This week, Billboard is taking a look back at the music video evolution of Panic! at the Disco, starting with 2006’s “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” all the way through their most recent effort, “Hey Look Ma, I Made It.”

The band’s first ever music video, “I Write Sins Not Tragedies,” follows a circus-themed wedding that goes awry, with frontman Brendon Urie playing both the role of ringmaster and narrator.

That same year, Urie played a singer at a strip club who has a rather tumultuous night in the “But It’s Better If You Do” video, while “Lying Is The Most Fun A Girl Can Have Without Taking Her Clothes Off” was accompanied by some stunning visuals -- featuring a tragic love story told by people with fish tanks on their heads -- directed by Travis Kopach.

The year 2007 saw the release of Panic! at the Disco’s “Build God, Then We'll Talk” video, which follows a "pornomime" (which is exactly what it sounds like) who falls in love with a fan, only for them to “cheat” on each other with imaginary people.

Their Beatles-infused music video for “Nine In The Afternoon” was released the following year, along with “Mad as Rabbits,” “That Green Gentleman (Things Have Changed)” and “Northern Downpour.” The group also dropped “It’s Almost Halloween” in 2008, which showcases the guys dressed as spooky characters as they perform a psychedelic dance routine.

Then, 2009’s “New Perspective” was peppered with clips of Jennifer's Body, the Megan Fox-starring film that the song appeared in. Urie went steampunk with 2011’s “The Ballad Of Mona Lisa,” while his group also shared a short film that year, titled The Overture, which featured a handful of tracks from their album Vices & Virtues.

In 2013, “Miss Jackson,” “This Is Gospel” and “Girls / Girls / Boys” were released, with the latter paying homage to D'Angelo's "Untitled (How Does It Feel)" music video. “Nicotine” came out the following year, as did the piano version of “This Is Gospel.”

Urie visits a living M.C. Escher-esque world in the 2015 video for “Hallelujah,” which he followed up with the devilish “Emperor's New Clothes” visuals, “Victorious” and “Death of a Bachelor.” In 2016’s “Don’t Threaten Me with a Good Time,” Urie swings by a nightclub and unknowingly went home with a tentacled woman, only for it to attack him and take his form.

Stranger Things star Noah Schnapp star in the band’s 2016 video “LA Devotee,” while 2018’s “Say Amen (Saturday Night)” sees a slew of assassins hilariously fail to kill Urie. The most recent Panic! at the Disco video, “Hey Look Ma, I Made It,” tackles some tough realities of being in the spotlight while utilizing an adorable puppet version of Urie to tell the story.

You can watch all of these music videos, and more, below.