Rimes Apologizes To Fans For New Album1

LeAnn Rimes took to the Web yesterday (Feb. 1) to directly address her fans about her ongoing legal wrangling and to apologize for the recently released album "I Need You," which she says she was "sho

LeAnn Rimes took to the Web yesterday (Feb. 1) to directly address her fans about her ongoing legal wrangling and to apologize for the recently released album "I Need You," which she says she was "shocked" to find out Curb Records was issuing without her cooperation.

"This album was made without my creative input," Rimes says in the note posted on her official Web site. "It consists largely of unfinished material and songs that didn't make other albums. I have not heard the album so I cannot tell you my opinion on it. But what I want to make abundantly clear to you is that this album is not a reflection of myself as an artist, but is solely the conception of Curb Records, and for that I am truly and deeply sorry."

Among the songs on the 10-track "In Need You," released earlier this week, is "Written in The Stars," a duet with Elton John that was released in February 1999 as a single on John's Rocket Records label. The album also features two songs -- "Can't Fight The Moonlight" and "But I Do Love You" -- which also appear on the "Coyote Ugly" soundtrack, which retakes the No. 1 position on Billboard's Top Country Albums chart this week, and rises to No. 23 on The Billboard 200.

The young country artist further explained that since turning 18, she has "been working on getting my business set up in a way that I would like to see it. Unfortunately, in order to do that I had to file a lawsuit against my previous manager and my father. This was an extremely difficult decision because I love my father very much."

In May, Rimes and her mother filed suit against her father, Wilbur Rimes, and his partner and her former co-manager Lyle Walker, alleging they stole more than $7 million from her over several years time and manipulated finances for their own personal benefit. In December, Wilbur Rimes filed a countersuit against his daughter's company, LeAnn Rimes Entertainment Inc. (LERI).

In November, LeAnn sued Curb to void her contract with the label, which she says she signed at the age of 12, "with my father's advice." Claiming the terms of the contract had not been "properly explained to me until recently," the artist says the agreement's six option periods calling for multiple releases in each "is not fair."

Calls to Curb Records for comment were not immediately returned..