Labels, Artists Rethinking Releases Following Attacks

The Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S. have left artists and labels grappling with how to handle potentially sensitive lyrics or imagery, Billboard Bulletin reports. Most label executives acknowle

The Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S. have left artists and labels grappling with how to handle potentially sensitive lyrics or imagery, Billboard Bulletin reports. Most label executives acknowledge that their approach to marketing new albums has changed, at least in the near term. "I think each label will be particularly sensitive to anything that might be deemed even closely offensive," says one executive.

Epitaph Records, for instance, recognized that the forthcoming release from Agnostic Front, "Dead Yuppies," might raise eyebrows. Rather than forcing the band to drop songs, the label asked Agnostic Front to write a disclaimer distancing the band from any politically motivated acts of violence. A sticker will be affixed to the album when it is released Oct. 9.

The Dave Matthews Band had hoped to release "When the World Ends" as the next radio single from its RCA album "Everyday." Instead, the band will opt for the title track, a "positive, healing song," according to a spokesperson. Matthews performed a solo acoustic version of the track during Friday night's "America: A Tribute to Heroes" telethon broadcast.

One U.S. act has even had to change its name. Kindercore Records duo I Am The World Trade Center is now I Am The ... In a statement, the critically acclaimed electronica duo says, "In the future, we hope that once again we can use our entire name, which we are so proud of."

European acts have also been affected. Bush has changed the name of the first single from its upcoming Atlantic album "Golden State" from "Speed Kills" to "The People That We Love." "We hope this change will reflect our desire to be part of the soothing that art brings," the band says in a statement.

Irish act the Cranberries has pulled the video for the single "Analyse" -- featuring planes flying over skyscrapers and chalk outlines of dead bodies -- from its Web site and video channels, according to a release from MCA.

U.K. techno-punk act Primal Scream premiered a song titled "Bomb the Pentagon" last month at a London concert; a group spokesperson says the track will not be included on forthcoming releases.

As previously reported, New York rock outfit the Strokes removed the song "New York City Cops" from its RCA album "Is This It." The change has pushed back the release of the much hyped set three weeks to Oct. 9.
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