Andrea Constand Testifies Against Bill Cosby: 'I Wasn't Able to Fight Him Away'

Andrea Constand walks to the courtroom for the trial of Bill Cosby on sexual assault charges at the Montgomery County Courthouse on June 6, 2017 in Norristown, Pa.
Matt Rourke-Pool/Getty Images

Andrea Constand walks to the courtroom for the trial of Bill Cosby on sexual assault charges at the Montgomery County Courthouse on June 6, 2017 in Norristown, Pa.

Per Maria Bustillos, during a brief recess at the Norristown, Pennsylvania, courthouse on day two of the Bill Cosby sex assault trial: Plaintiff Andrea Constand took the stand Tuesday (June 6) and gave her first public testimony of the night in January 2004 when she was allegedly drugged and sexually assaulted by Cosby.

Cosby’s legal team questioned the 44-year-old former Temple University employee about the alleged phone calls she made to the comic after their encounter, calls she characterized as business-related, but nevertheless the defense made the point to emphasize that, of the alleged 72 phone calls that were made, she had called him 53 times.

Constand had continued speaking to Cosby on the phone and met him in person at least once more, she said, out of fear of what would happen to her career.

The defense also questioned Constand on why she brought Cosby bath salts, gifts, she claimed, were intended for his wife.

Deadline’s Dominic Patten was able to relate a few quotes, which he described via Twitter as “heartbreaking,” when Constand was cross-examined by Montgomery County deputy district attorney Kristen Feden:

On the pretext of her visit to Cosby’s home that night: “He was a Temple friend, someone I trusted, a mentor.” He had given her pills to help her “relax” and described the pills as “your friends” and to “put them down.”

When the pills kicked in: “I began to slur my words and I told Mr. Cosby that I had trouble seeing him and I was seeing two of him. When I stood up, my legs were not strong and I began to panic a bit… I don’t remember passing out.”

On the alleged assault: “I wanted him to stop. In my head, I was trying to get my hands to move and my legs to move but I was frozen. I wasn’t able to fight him away.”

The aftermath: “I did not have the courage at the time to tell my family, so I just went along with it.”

Jeremy Roebuck of the Philadelphia Inquirer noted how the 79-year-old defendant reacted to Constand’s testimony:

More to come.

This article was originally published by Death and Taxes.

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