Campaigning Suspended in U.K. Election After Deadly Explosion at Ariana Grande Concert

Campaigning has been suspended in Britain's national election after a deadly explosion at Manchester Arena where Ariana Grande had performed.

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn says he and Prime Minister Theresa May had spoken after the explosion, in which at least 22 people were killed and more than 59 were injured. 

Corbyn said Tuesday he is "horrified" by the events in Manchester and that his thoughts are with the families and friends of those who have died and been injured.

May and Corbyn have agreed to suspend election campaigning ahead of the June 8 general election until further notice. 

Earlier, the Prime Minister issued a statement on the tragedy. "We are working to establish the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack. All our thoughts are with the victims and the families of those who have been affected," she said. 

May canceled campaign events Tuesday after the blast; she is due to chair a meeting of the government's emergency committee, COBRA, later.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron canceled a campaign tour to Gibraltar after the explosion, which police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

Meanwhile, The Department of Homeland Security says there is no evidence of credible threats against music venues in the U.S., as England reels from an explosion at the concert late Monday.

The department says the U.S. public may experience increased security in and around public places and events.

DHS says it is closely monitoring the situation at Manchester Arena and working with U.K. officials to obtain additional information about the cause of the explosion.

The government is urging U.S. citizens in Manchester to heed directions from local authorities and be vigilant about their security.

The explosion killed at least 19 people and injured dozens. Police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.