Grammy Hall Of Fame Adds 55 Albums, Songs

Willie Nelson's classic 1975 album "Red Headed Stranger" and Bob Dylan's 1965 breakthrough rock set "Highway 61 Revisited" are among 55 titles newly added to the Recording Academy's Grammy Hall of Fam

Willie Nelson's classic 1975 album "Red Headed Stranger" and Bob Dylan's 1965 breakthrough rock set "Highway 61 Revisited" are among 55 titles newly added to the Recording Academy's Grammy Hall of Fame. Established in 1973 to honor "recordings of enduring quality and relevance or historical significance," the hall now includes 585 titles selected by a panel of respected professionals from the recording arts field.

"The Grammy Hall of Fame is one of the Academy's most prized endeavors, spotlighting recorded musical masterpieces that have significantly impacted our musical history," Recording Academy president/CEO Michael Greene said in a statement. "This year's selections are timeless recordings and compositions of social significance that deserve to be memorialized."

Several socially conscious songs are among the new inductees, including Pete Seeger's 1964 plea for peace, "Where Have All the Flowers Gone," and Marvin Gaye's 1971 environmental lament, "Mercy Mercy Me (the Ecology)." Other albums honored are Blood, Sweat & Tears' 1969 self-titled album, Arlo Guthrie's "Alice's Restaurant," and 1965's "Horowitz at Carnegie Hall - An Historic Return," by late pianist Vladimir Horowitz, which the Recording Academy described as "one of the most important 'event' recordings of the 20th Century."

Last August, the Recording Academy established the Latin Grammy Hall of Fame with an initial class of 17 recordings, ranging from Antonio Carlos Jobim's "The Girl From Ipanema" to Santana's "Oye Como Va."

The full list of 2002 Grammy Hall of Fame inductees and full roster of honored titles is available online at grammy.aol.com.
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