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Michael Brown's Mother Says Appearing in Beyonce's 'Lemonade' Movie Made Her Feel 'Special'

Beyonce
Daniela Vesco/Parkwood Entertainment/PictureGroup

Beyonce performs during the Formation World Tour at AT&T Stadium on May 9, 2016, in Arlington, Texas.

?Michael Brown's mother, Lezley McSpadden, says in an upcoming SiriusXM interview that appearing in Beyonce's Lemonade mini-film made her feel "special" and that she appreciates Bey "for being bold enough to confront things and be sensitive at the same time."

McSpadden sat down with publisher Judith Regan for a special one-hour SiriusXM interview that will air in full on May 21 on the Stars channel (109), in which the mother of the black teenager killed by police in Ferguson, MO, in 2014 discussed her new memoir, Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil and the mood on the set of the Lemonade shoot.

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"I felt special. She had done some nice things for my son’s foundation so, at that point whatever you want me to do, I’ll do it… She’s a sweet person… really down to earth," McSpadden said of Beyoncé, who also invited the mothers of three other black men killed by police to cameo in her one-hour film: Oscar Grant, Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner. "She treated us well, made sure we were comfortable. I tried to hold it together but, any time I’m talking about my son or looking at a picture I just think that he’s gone. I appreciate her for being bold enough to confront things and be sensitive at the same time." 

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McSpadden vividly described the day her son was shot, saying, "I jumped out of the car and felt like I was running for miles. I saw the tape and one officer. I looked around and saw the sheet… I felt like I died." She also suggested some solutions for black teens concerned that they could be victims of violence. "I don’t want them [kids] to be scared," she said. "I want them to be aware. We want the police to show the difference between good policing and bad policing."