Television Plugs Back In

The catalog of seminal New York rock act Television will be upgraded this fall with new editions of the albums "Marquee Moon" and "Adventure," plus the first official release of the oft-bootlegged con

The catalog of seminal New York rock act Television will be upgraded this fall with new editions of the albums "Marquee Moon" and "Adventure," plus the first official release of the oft-bootlegged concert disc "Live at the Old Waldorf." Rhino will release the sets on Sept. 23.

Released in 1977, "Marquee Moon" set the rock underground ablaze, on the strength of the signature inter-twining guitar work of Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd and such classic cuts as the nearly 11-minute title track and "Elevation." The new edition of the album includes alternate takes of "Friction," "Marquee Moon" and "See No Evil," a previously unreleased instrumental and the early single "Little Johnny Jewel," the full version of which has never been issued on CD.

Although by no means a hit upon its release (it failed to appear on the Billboard album chart), "Marquee Moon" has become something of a holy grail of independent rock in the years since. It has been a clear influence on such artists as Pavement, Sonic Youth, the Strokes and Jeff Buckley, who recorded material shortly before his 1997 death with Verlaine as the producer.

"Adventure," released in 1978, extended the band's mastery of dynamics with songs such as "The Dream's Dream" and "Glory," which were slightly less aggressive than those on "Marquee Moon." Rhino's reissue features the previously unreleased cut "Adventure," an early version of "Glory," and both an alternate mix and instrumental version of "Ain't That Nothin'."

"Live at the Old Waldorf" was taped June 29, 1978, just months before Television splintered due to inter-band tensions. The set hits all the high points from the two studio albums, as well as "Little Johnny Jewel" and a cover of the Rolling Stones' "Satisfaction." The album will only be available to order online through Rhino's Handmade imprint.

After more than a decade of inactivity, Television suddenly reunited in late 1991 to record a new, self-titled album for Capitol and embark on a tour, but the period of activity was short lived. After another extended hiatus, the group reformed in 2001 for a run of shows in the U.K. and North America.

Television has played a handful of gigs this year the U.S. and Spain, and is set for performances Sept. 25 in Tokyo and Sept. 27 at the Asagiri Jam Festival in Fujinomiya, Japan.