Eastwood: Soundtracks Should Have Score Focus

Actor/producer/director Clint Eastwood bemoaned the fact that film soundtracks have moved away from conventional scoring to the use of songs during his keynote speech at the Hollywood Reporter/Billboa

Actor/producer/director Clint Eastwood bemoaned the fact that film soundtracks have moved away from conventional scoring to the use of songs during his keynote speech at the Hollywood Reporter/Billboard Film & TV Music Conference Wednesday in Los Angeles.

"It's like they were looking for a hit record: 'If the movie tanks, maybe the record'll do well,' " Eastwood said in the session with the Reporter's editor in chief and publisher, Robert Dowling. Eastwood said his score for his current feature "Mystic River" was the most difficult piece of music writing in his career.

Asked about pending changes in the music business, Eastwood -- whose Malpaso Records imprint is distributed by Warner Bros. -- said the sale of that company's music assets would be "kind of a shame, because they've got a lot of tradition."

Of the future of the business, he said, "I don't know where it's going ... Out of frustration, the audience is due for a change, and we don't know what it is. The record executives are waiting for something, hoping it will fall out of the sky."

Also at the conference, Robert Rodriguez revealed during his Vanguard Session presentation that he is writing the orchestral score for the Quentin Tarantino-directed Miramax film "Kill Bill Vol. 2," which hits U.S. theaters on Feb. 20, 2004. In addition, film/TV composer James Newton Howard announced he will work with Oscar-winner Hans Zimmer on the score to "Secret Window." The Columbia Pictures thriller, starring Johnny Depp, will be out next year.