Jackson Prosecutors Plan To Wrap Up Case

Stung by several recent rulings favorable to the defense, prosecutors in the Michael Jackson child-molestation case said they planned to wrap up their case as early as this week. Jackson's trial was s

Stung by several recent rulings favorable to the defense, prosecutors in the Michael Jackson child-molestation case said they planned to wrap up their case as early as this week. Jackson's trial was scheduled to resume today (April 25) following a three-day break. Judge Rodney S. Melville canceled Friday's court session when witnesses were not available to testify.

Melville denied prosecution requests Thursday to present testimony on battered women's syndrome as it relates to the mother of Jackson's accuser and to present salacious new testimony from a former Jackson employee.

Melville said, however, that he would allow the ex-employee, Kassim Abdool, to attempt to corroborate an account from Ralph Chacon, a former employee who says he saw Jackson commit a sex act on a child in 1992 or 1993.

Abdool and Chacon were among employees who lost a wrongful termination suit against Jackson in 1997 and were ordered to pay damages to the entertainer.

The judge also said Thursday he would allow testimony from Chris Carter, a former Jackson security guard who was recently arrested for investigation of robbery in Las Vegas. Carter was among those expected to testify this week.

Speculation also has mounted about whether prosecutors will call the pop star's former wife, Debbie Rowe. Rowe is battling Jackson for custody of their two children, Prince, 8, and Paris, 7.

Prosecutors said last week they planned to rest their case during this, the trial's ninth week, clearing the way for Jackson's attorneys to begin their defense of the pop star.

Jackson, 46, is accused of molesting a 13-year-old boy in February or March 2003, giving the boy alcohol and conspiring to hold the boy's family captive to get them to rebut a TV documentary in which Jackson appeared with the boy and said he allowed children to sleep in his bed. Jackson called the sleeping arrangement an innocent, non-sexual practice.


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