Ask Billboard

Keith Caulfield answers readers' questions about Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Snow Patrol, Muse and the Billboard Boxscores chart.

OH YEAH

Hello Keith,

I love your weekly column for Billboard.com.

As a big fan of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs I am thrilled to see the track "Hello Tomorrow," on which the band's vocalist Karen O. is featured, entering the Hot 100.

I know that this song can be heard on an Adidas TV commercial (directed by another favorite of mine, Spike Jonze) and that it is available as an Apple iTunes Store download. Do you maybe know whether it is available on CD, whether a CD-single or on an entire album?

Thank you for reading my e-mail and have a good day,

Niko Mitsarakis

Hello Niko,

Right now, the only place you can find "Hello Tomorrow" by Squeak E. Clean featuring Karen O. is at the Apple iTunes Music Store. In fact, for the most recent reporting period, the track sold nearly 11,000 downloads. That was enough to prompt a debut at No. 35 on Billboard's Hot Digital Songs, No. 53 on the Pop 100 and No. 85 on the Hot 100.



SNOWY MUSE

Hi Keith,

I have become a fan of Snow Patrol and Muse, and both are more popular overseas than the United States. I am surprised to see that neither cracked past the Top Heatseekers charts. I was wondering if you can shed some light on sales figures for both bands in the United States.

Thanks for your help.

Yogi

Hi Yogi,

You must be mistaken as both acts have appeared on The Billboard 200.

Snow Patrol peaked at No. 1 on Top Heatseekers with "Final Straw," which reached No. 91 on The Billboard 200, while Muse's "Absolution" spent four weeks atop the Heatseekers tally and made it to 107 on the bigger list.

According to Nielsen SoundScan, "Final Straw" has sold 382,000 copies in the United States, while "Absolution" has moved 371,000.



OUTSIDE THE BOX

Keith,

I check Billboard's Boxscore chart each week, and you are not listing the U2 shows. Since they are all sold out, how can you not list them in your charts?

Marilyn Dixon

Hi Marilyn,

The weekly Boxscore chart -- which lists the top grossing concerts -- is dependent on promoters of various tours and shows reporting to Billboard. Thus, if a promoter -- for whatever reason -- fails to inform Billboard, then the data for their shows is not included in the chart.