Spector Gun History To Be Heard At Trial

Four women who claim that Phil Spector pointed guns at them during dates will be allowed to testify when the record producer stands trial on charges of shooting dead an actress at his mansion, a judge

Four women who claim that Phil Spector pointed guns at them during dates will be allowed to testify when the record producer stands trial on charges of shooting dead an actress at his mansion, a judge ruled yesterday (May 23).

Los Angeles Superior Court judge Larry Fidler said the prosecution could call the four women as part of its case against Spector, who has denied murdering an actress he picked up in a Los Angeles nightclub in February 2003.

The judge gave no reason for his decision, but prosecutors had argued that the incidents involving the women were "remarkably similar" to the current case against Spector.

The ruling was a setback for the reclusive Spector, who prosecutors allege has a history of gun-related violence against women and others.

Dorothy Melvin, one of the four women, told closed-door grand jury hearings last year that she was romantically involved with Spector around 1990. She woke at his home one night to find him pointing a handgun at her new car. He then pointed the weapon at her, accused her of snooping and stealing and told her to leave.

Another woman, photographer Stephanie Jennings, said Spector confronted her in a hotel room after a rock music ceremony in 1995, then returned with a gun and sat in a chair in front of the door.

A third woman, who dated Spector and then became a personal assistant in 1988, is expected to testify that Spector pointed a handgun at her when she went back home with him after a dinner date. A few weeks later he is said to have chased her with an assault rifle after a dinner party.

A fourth woman is expected to testify that Spector pointed a gun to her head and began to yell and swear at her because she wanted to return to her hotel room.

Spector, 64, is free on $1 million bail while awaiting trial in September for the murder of Lana Clarkson at his Los Angeles-area home. An autopsy report concluded that a gun was placed in the mouth of the actress and fired. Spector has said Clarkson committed suicide for reasons he does not understand.

Judge Fidler ruled that prosecutors would not be allowed to tell the jury in Spector's trial about the music mogul's two gun-related convictions in 1972 and 1975, or several other alleged incidents of violence involving guns.


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