The Right Size

Mere days after Minneapolis quartet Tapes 'N Tapes self-released its debut album, "The Loon," last November, the band received an unexpected call from Capitol Records. "It was really bizarre," lead si

Mere days after Minneapolis quartet Tapes 'N Tapes self-released its debut album, "The Loon," last November, the band received an unexpected call from Capitol Records. "It was really bizarre," lead singer Josh Grier says. "We were just like, 'What? What's going on?'"

Much to the disbelief of the quirky art-rockers, whose sound is rooted in '90s alternative acts Pavement and the Pixies, the instant blog buzz following the release of the album led record labels to express interest right off the bat.

"We kept getting contacted by labels, and it was like, 'Oh crap, this might actually be going somewhere,'" Grier says. After fielding calls from labels big and small, Tapes 'N Tapes signed in May with XL Recordings, which will rerelease "The Loon" this week.

The decision to sign with a label arose after the band's grass-roots operation grew unwieldy. Like other Internet-hyped bands such as Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, Tapes 'N Tapes experienced an explosion in popularity quicker than anyone manning the band's bedroom office in Minneapolis could accommodate. "Signing with XL was really more of a business decision," band manager Keri Weise says. "We were designing the Web site, making our own T-shirts and doing all the distribution-every single aspect of it. We couldn't function anymore."