Art & Soul

For a band that makes such edgy, experimental music, TV on the Radio is almost quaint when it comes to its business strategy.

For a band that makes such edgy, experimental music, TV on the Radio is almost quaint when it comes to its business strategy. "We haven't put our music in ads so far, and we have a clause in our contract that states our songs won't be associated with cigarettes, alcohol brands or the military," singer Tunde Adebimpe says. "We don't want to see corporate banners at our shows, either. I want the live experience to remain unmarred."

The same uncompromising ethic runs throughout the songs on the band's latest record, "Dear Science," due Sept. 23 via Interscope. Previously signed to Touch & Go, TV on the Radio debuted on the major with 2006's "Return to Cookie Mountain," which has sold 189,000 copies in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

For TV on the Radio, however, hits are a long shot, and the members of the band are perfectly fine with that. "We write five-minute-long songs about global warming," producer/guitarist Dave Sitek says sardonically. "They don't exactly make a natural fit to be played over the credits of a reality show."

Indeed, many of the tracks from "Dear Science" fall on the artier end of the spectrum, with Sitek's orchestral production style popping up almost everywhere. Influences like David Bowie and Prince are proudly displayed; the album's sexually explicit closer, "Lover's Day," could easily be an outtake from the Purple One.