The 10 Best Moments From the 2018 Oscars

In a time when Hollywood has been at the forefront of pop culture for both controversial and uplifting reasons, the 2018 Oscars may have been the most pertinent of the last 90 years. As the biggest names in the business gathered in Los Angeles’ Dolby Theatre Sunday night (March 4), returning host Jimmy Kimmel declared that it would be “a night of positivity,” and the show followed suit — there was hardly anything bad to say about the nearly four-hour broadcast.

Following Kimmel’s encouraging and tastefully funny opening monologue, the show was filled with powerful performances, historic wins, and inspiring messages sent from women and men alike. Check out our favorite moments from the nothing-but-positive 2018 Oscars below.

Kimmel’s Monologue

The late night host opened his second Oscars hosting gig by addressing both last year’s best picture flub and the sexual harassment movements — including a shot at Harvey Weinstein — that was a perfect mix of witty and sensitive. It was an apropos kick-off to the night, to say the least.

Acceptance Speech Timer to Win a Jet Ski

At the end of Kimmel’s monologue, he joked that he’d be timing all of the acceptance speeches to ensure that the show wouldn’t go as long as it has in previous years (which didn’t end up changing anything time-wise, as it went almost an hour over schedule). To make the joke even funnier, Kimmel threw in a jet ski as the prize for the shortest speech, presented by the one and only Helen Mirren. Although Kimmel really only outwardly monitored the first speech, it resulted in a pretty funny running joke about wanting the jet ski all night — yet, he still knew who the winner was, awarding Phantom Thread costume designer Mark Bridges with his jet ski at the end of the show.

Get Out Joke, Featuring an Appearance From Lakeith Stanfield

Keeping in line with his timing promise, Kimmel said that if you go over time on your speech, you will be told to “Get out.” To really make himself clear, he had a little help from Get Out actor Lakeith Stanfield, who was in full costume from the film — and likely instilled some fear in those winners who would be giving speeches from there on out.

Superstars Play Movie Crashers

Kimmel enlisted a slew of actors including Lin-Manuel Miranda, Margot Robbie and Gal Gadot to parade over to an advance screening of A Wrinkle in Time that was happening down the street from the Oscars. Most of the celebrities walked in bearing theater snacks to hand out -- with Ansel Elgort and Armie Hammer sporting hot dog cannons -- to those in the theater as a way to say thank you to moviegoers for seeing movies, which likely made everyone watching at home completely jealous.

Tiffany Haddish and Maya Rudolph as Presenters 

Putting these two together as presenters simply sounds like a brilliant idea, but when they actually took the stage together — holding their heels in their hands, naturally — the comedic actresses practically kickstarted a campaign for the two of them to host next year’s ceremony. While pretty much everything they said was hilarious, it was definitely their shot at the #OscarsSoWhite controversy that took the cake: "Are the Oscars too black? Don’t worry, there are plenty more white people to come tonight."

Common and Andra Day’s Moving "Stand Up For Something" Performance 

Although it didn’t end up taking home the best original song award, Common and Andra Day’s song “Stand Up For Something” made a big impact on the night as both singers came out strong in their performance of the Marshall track. Common’s message at the beginning of the song and what he said throughout were striking on their own, but adding Andra’s powerful vocals to the mix and the people on stage behind them in spotlights and you’ve got yourself one hell of a goosebumps-inducing performance. Keala Settle’s powerful performance of The Greatest Showman hit "This Is Me” was certainly a close second, but there was no beating the combination of Common’s awe-inspiring delivery and Day’s booming voice.

Trailblazers Montage 

In a segment dedicated to the #MeToo movement and Times Up initiative, the likes of Ava DuVernay, Lee Daniels, Kumail Nanjiani, Geena Davis and more “trailblazers” in the industry spoke about the changes that are happening and those who have ignited the fire for that to happen. Introduced by Ashley Judd (who was one of the first to speak out against Harvey Weinstein), Salma Hayek and Annabella Sciorra, the video montage was as inspiring as those who have been part of the recent movements, with Daniels adding one of the most affecting messages: “Get ready for some more Black Panthers, some more Wrinkle In Times. We’re here, and we’re not going anywhere.”


The Inevitable Matt Damon Reference

Following a meaningful dedication to wartime films and those who have served our country, Kimmel found a way to incorporate his ongoing “beef” with Matt Damon. "I want to apologize to our men and women of the armed forces for including Matt Damon in that.” And after Warren Beatty successfully announced best picture flub-free, Kimmel couldn’t close out the show without his classic, “Apologies to Matt Damon, we ran out of time for him."

Chrissy Teigen and John Legend’s Google Commercial

The famous couple seemingly weren’t in attendance at this year’s show, but they still managed to make a hilarious cameo. In one of the final commercial breaks of the broadcast, Teigen and Legend popped up on an add for Google Assistant, in which Teigen is attempting to search for a show as Legend sing-thinks his frustration (we promise it’s funnier than that sounds).

Frances McDormand Standing With Her Fellow Females

In one of the most empowering moments of the night, the Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri actress took a moment to recognize all of the women she was nominated alongside this year, calling for all of them to stand with her during her best actress acceptance speech. "Look around, ladies and gentlemen. We all have stories we need to tell and projects we need financed. Invite us into your office in a couple days — or you can come to ours, whichever suits you best — and we’ll tell you all about them.” And in perhaps one of the most importantly prevalent declarations of the night, McDormand closed out her speech by calling for more diversity in filmmaking: "I have two words to leave with you tonight: Inclusion rider.”

2018 Academy Awards

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