Rock

Iron Maiden's Bruce Dickinson Reveals Breakthrough COVID-19 Infection

Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden
Gonzales Photo/Terje Dokken/PYMCA/Avalon/UIG via Getty Images

Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden performs during the Swedish music festival Sweden Rock Festival 2018 on June 6, 2018.

"I could be in serious trouble," the metal icon said about his prospects if he hadn't been vaccinated.

Iron Maiden singer Bruce Dickinson is the latest musician to open up about testing positive for COVID-19 after being vaccinated. Dickinson, 63, postponed the final two shows on his U.K. spoken-word tour earlier this week after there was a coronavirus case in his "immediate household" and after beginning a government-mandated 10-day quarantine at home the metal icon said he began feeling like he was getting a cold.

“I thought, ‘Oh well, s--t.’ I was kind of sneezing a bit. For a couple of days, I felt a bit groggy, kind of like the flu, and that was it," Dickinson told Rolling Stone. "I’ve pretty much got no doubt that had I not had the vaccine, I could be in serious trouble.” Since he's stuck at home, Dickinson has used the time to promote the band's upcoming double album, Senjutsu, which the band will begin touring behind next June.

Though he told the magazine he doesn't personally believe vaccinations should be required for fans to attend the shows, he's ready to hit the road either way. “It is a personal choice,” he said, adding that he still hopes that his fans will choose to get jabbed. “Personally, I think people are just very badly advised if they don’t go and get themselves double jabbed as quickly as possible, not for the reasons of going into concerts, but for their own health."

Dickinson said he believes that his breakthrough case could have been way worse if he hadn't been vaccinated and he was happy to just stay indoors and not pass it along to anyone who might be vulnerable.

Though he's refused the flu shot in the past, Dickinson said he thinks COVID is a different case because of it is so highly transmissible and could be fatal to the unvaccinated. “Even if you’ve had a double jab, you can still get COVID, and therefore you can spread it to other people who might not have been vaccinated and they might get very sick and die,” he told RS.

“Now you cannot legislate against mortality. There are many things in this world that kill people and they’re not illegal but are unfortunate. Cancer kills a lot of people. Heart attacks kill a lot of people. Obesity kills a lot of people. Malaria kills a s---load of people every year. … So at some point, we have to just go, ‘We’re probably going to have to live with this. And if we’re going to live with it, then you have your vaccination.’"

Dickinson's breakthrough case comes after country icon Reba McEntire revealed this week that despite being double vaxxed she and her boyfriend also recently tested positive for the highly contagious virus that has infected nearly 35 million Americans and killed more than 620,000.