Weezer Breaks Down Their 'Stream of Consciousness' Song 'Happy Hour'

According to Weezer's lead singer Rivers Cuomo, out of their 173 song catalogue, it's their new single "Happy Hour" that really stands out.

Cuomo applied his favorite writing technique to the Pacific Daydream highlight, which he describes as a product of stream of consciousness and free association. "It's like you're lying back on a couch in psychotherapy and you just have to say the next thing that comes into your mind," the singer tells Billboard. "Sometimes it sounds like complete nonsense to whoever's listening but there's some kind of logic in my brain.

"Happy Hour" depicts the "ultimate joyous" moments of hanging out at a bar during -- you guessed it -- happy hour. The inspiration came from when Cuomo used to watch Stevie Ray Vaughan play guitar solos "teeth grindin', sweatin' under the lights." The next thing to float into Cuomo's stream of consciousness is what could ruin this joyous mood -- "the 20 lb weight from Monty Python's Flying Circus landing on the unsuspecting lead singer."

For the track's third verse and "grand finale," Cuomo wanted to set the scene of meeting a girl during happy hour but didn't just want it to be another "pretty girl." Once again, his stream of consciousness kicks in and the first thing he pictures is a "a scientist in sweatpants and a hair tie." The girl is based on Rosie Okumura, who Cuomo did meet in Santa Monica once.

"One day I went over ot her apartment and she showed me her keyboards because she's an aspiring songwriter and singers," he explains. "I just used details from her room and that conversation to fill out this imaginary encounter with a scientist."

The ultimate goal for "Happy Hour" is make you want to dance but also feel the contradicting feeling of sadness at the same time. "Hopefully you want to keep hitting repeat," says Cuomo.

Watch exactly how it went down in the video above.

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