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Metallica Goes Menswear: See Their Queen-Inspired Brioni Ad

Metallica in 2016
Jeff Yeager/Metallica/Getty Images

Metallica at Rasputin Music on April 16, 2016 in Berkeley, Calif. 

Is Justin O'Shea, the new creative director of Brioni, starting his own version of Hedi Slimane's famous music project for Saint Laurent with his debut campaign for the Italian luxury menswear label? Perhaps.

O'Shea tapped heavy metal band Metallica -- current members Kirk Hammett, Lars Ulrich, James Hetfield and Robert Trujillo -- to star in the brand's new black-and-white ad. The images, photographed by Zackery Michael in San Francisco, were inspired by Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" cover art.

"We are beyond thrilled to have been invited to be the face of Italian luxury menswear powerhouse Brioni as they kick off their first creative campaign under the direction of newly appointed creative director, uber cool style star Justin O’Shea," the band wrote on their Instagram account.

 

 

Clad in bespoke Brioni suits and tuxedos, the rockers show off their best Blue Steel. (Or in Ulrich's case, a mean Joker smile.)  

The campaign comes two weeks after Metallica launched a collaboration with L.A.-based line Citizens of Humanity and e-comm site Mytheresa for a denim collaboration influenced by the band's heavy metal style.

Lars Ulrich Takes Us Inside Metallica's Record Store Day Vault, Teases New Album

The influences of heavy metal fashion are taking over the runways, too. Guys wore chokers during Louis Vuitton's show; chains hung off pants at Demna Gvasalia's debut menwear collection for Balenciaga; and black-and-white checkers were a popular pattern on the DSquared2 runway. Even Zayn enlisted illustrator Mark Wilkinson, who is best known for creating cover art for Iron Maiden and Judas Priest, for his new tour merch.

To which we say, rock on.

This story originally appeared on HollywoodReporter.com

 

 


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