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Dua Lipa Talks 'Future Nostalgia' & Never Shying Away From Speaking Her Mind in Beats 1 Interview

Dua Lipa and Zane Lowe
Courtesy of Apple 

Dua Lipa and Zane Lowe

Dua Lipa is finally unveiling her highly-anticipated sophomore album, Future Nostalgia, in 2020, and she recently chatted with Zane Lowe on Apple Music’s Beats 1 about growing as an artist.     

"When I started [making] Future Nostalgia, I had a couple people be like, 'All right, you sure this is what you want to do?' Because obviously it is so different from the last record and the last record had the success it did, but I felt, as an artist, I had to grow and I had to mature," she explained. "After touring for so long, I wanted it to be more instrumental and I felt more comfortable in the studio, so I kind of went in and gave my two cents on what I would want the production to sound like, which wasn't something that I did on my first record."

With songs that scream "You don't need him," like "New Rules," "IDGAF" and, most recently, "Don't Start Now," it's no surprise that Lipa takes every opportunity to stand up for her fellow women. "I spoke about like women in Saudi Arabia and the rights and the things that happen or like if I'm supporting different charities and talking about certain things, especially women protesting about women's rights...It does wind people up. I think that the whole abortion rights as well, that definitely kicked up a fuss...I'm never going to shy away from that and I feel like I have to be a voice for my audience as well because they gave me that platform for that reason."     

One of the songs on her album, which she calls "lyrically" her favorite, is "about being a woman in general."     

"What it's like walking home at night, what it's like different things that as a gal I feel like we have to kind of live through and go through and that people don't necessarily think is a struggle for us," she said. "It's really kind of like cutting really straight to the point kind of lyrics, which is something like, as an example, when I'd walk home from school and it would be dark and there'd be boys in the streets on their bicycles or whatever. I would walk down the street like Wolverine with my keys through my knuckles and just run up to my house.   

Listen to the interview below.

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