Viva Friday Playlist: The Best Songs of the Week by Tini With Sebastián Yatra, Mau & Ricky, More

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TINI and Sebastián Yatra, "Oye" 

Viva Friday is a compilation of the best new songs, albums and videos recommended by Billboard Latin editors.

“Oye” - Tini & Sebastián Yatra

Tini and Sebstián Yatra have joined forces once again to release the new romantic pop song "Oye." The new single is the continuation of their hit "Cristina," which is part of Yatra's album Fantasia. “Oye” tells the story of a couple who are no longer together, and he gets his first record deal and begins to enjoy popularity, while Cristina is looking to get him back. See what happens below. -- SUZETTE FERNANDEZ

"A Tu Manera (Corbata)" - Sofia Reyes & Jhay Cortez

Just six months after dropping her empowering "R.I.P.," featuring an all-girl power squad with Anitta and Rita Ora, Sofia Reyes returns with her new single "A Tu Manera (Corbata)" in collaboration with Jhay Cortez. Over a melodious fusion of Latin trap, pop and circus music, the Mexican-American songstress and Puerto Rican urban artist flirtatiously sing about a girl who's playing hard to get but is nonetheless won over by the man who's crushing on her. "The way you touch me, sabes bien que yo no soy cualquiera Y no me asusta, a mí me gusta Y si me gusta lo hacemos a tu manera," the bilingual chorus states. With no explanation needed, the music video was inspired by the classic 1951 Disney film Alice in Wonderland. A week before releasing her new track, Reyes teamed up with Abraham Mateo for his heartfelt country-infused urban track "Que Ha Pasao." -- JESSICA ROIZ

"En Boca de Todos" - T3R Elemento

T3r Elemento has no time for haters and they are sending the message loud and clear in their new single “En Boca de Todos.” In an infectious corrido that has fresh alternative and Regional Mexican rhythms, the Los Angeles and Las Vegas-based group gets real about envious people. “I started to excel and it sparked envy/ He was bothered and wanted to push me down, it seems like it hurt him/ Today, he’s doing good in life, but they talk for no reason/ Since they don’t see me on the ground anymore, they don’t like that anymore,” the in-your-face lyrics kick off. The single dropped Thursday with a lyric video that shows a snake slither through the text. Check it out below. -- JR

“Amor Arrayano” - Yasser Tejeda & Palotré, feat. Vicente García

High school bandmates Yasser Tejeda and Vicente García collaborate in "Amor Arrayano," the second cut off Tejeda’s Kijombo album, out now. The jazz-tinged tune is delicately feathered by simple guitar and bass chords harmonizing with Garcia’s vocals. The song borrows a line from a chant to Papa Legba, an African deity who also serves as a spiritual intermediary for mortals in Haitian and Dominican syncretic religions and touches the perplexing issue of border separation through a love story: Amor que en mi pecho no tiene bandera, no tiene color, religión ni frontera. Amor que si vuelve le prendo una vela (“the love in my heart has no flag, color, religion or border. A love I will light a candle for upon its return”). -- PAMELA BUSTIOS

“Bota Fuego” – Mau & Ricky and Nicky Jam

Mau & Ricky are back with a new collaboration, this time with Nicky Jam. The trio released “Bota Fuego,” which takes the siblings deep into the urban world after leaving behind, for now, their romanticism and traditional pop sounds. “Bota” was produced by DJ Luian, Mambo Kingz & Jowny, and penned by Mau & Ricky and Nicky Jam. -- SF

"Pájaro Cenzontle"  – Son Rompe Pera

Mexico’s cumbia sonidera ensemble Son Rompe Pera harks back to Super Grupo Colombia in their reimagination of the 1980 band’s “Pájaro Cenzontle.” The Gama brothers-led group’s debut single, from its forthcoming album Batuco named after their recently deceased father– replaces the Colombian accordion with the lively marimba for a more popular built-up feel in contrast with their garage/punk approach.  The quintet channels the ‘Cenzontle,’ the Mexican mockingbird whose name derives from the Nahuatl language words ‘centzontli’ (four hundred) and ‘Tototl’ (bird), essentially translating into the bird of the 400 voices. -- PB

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