Alejandro Sanz Opens Up About Dreamers, Camila Cabello, Reggaeton On 'El Factor Latino' Podcast

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Alejandro Sanz is seen performing during his "La Gira" tour concert at the American Airlines Arena on Sept. 7, 2019 in Miami.

Alejandro Sanz is an open book in this week’s episode of Billboard’s “El Factor Latino” podcast hosted by Billboard Latin editors Suzette Fernandez and Jessica Roiz.

The Spanish singer -- who for the past three decades has been crooning the music world with his flamenco-influenced ballads, poetic lyrics, and soothing voice -- talked about everything from the reason he supports DREAMERS, to what he likes and doesn’t like about the way music is created nowadays, as well as his interesting concert rituals. 

In late 2018, Sanz made his comeback to the music scene after a four-year hiatus with his studio album #ElDisco and #LaGira tour, which culminates Oct. 5 at the SAP Center in San Jose, California. He is also the top artist nominee for the 20th annual Latin Grammy Awards in eight categories, including album of the year, record of the year, and song of the year. 

Check out highlights from and listen to the podcast below:

On supporting the DREAMERS: It’s an unfair situation. DREAMERS are boys and girls who came to this country at a young age, they don’t know any other place and consider themselves from the U.S. but they don’t have legal status. They didn’t commit any crime but they are in this difficult situation so what we want to do is help them opt to legalize their situation and one way or another get legal advice and for them not to feel alone, which for me, is very important. 

On collaborating with Camila Cabello on “Persona Favorita”: “She has a huge heart and she’s always supporting every cause, without being afraid of what people think. At the same time, she’s a girl with incredible talent, it’s undeniable -- but she’s also very funny. She’s very real. Honestly, that song would have not been the same without her.” 

On keeping his musical essence: “There’s no secret. I just don’t know how to create anything else. I liked urban music many years ago. I did an entire album called No Es Lo Mismo that also had many urban tracks. I’m not afraid of rhythms but sometimes the lyrics don’t convince me. I think it’s important to keep faithful to what you do, basically because it’s what you know how to do. I don’t see myself perreando.” 

On “La Tortura” with Shakira: “This song put Latin music in a place where it wasn’t until that moment to the point that it reached No. 1 on mainstream radio stations. It crossed borders for the first time. There were many huge Latin artists such as Juan Gabriel, but they were exclusive to the Latin world. It was impossible to hear a Spanish-language song in the Anglo market.”


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