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Alejandro Sanz Must Pay Former Manager Nearly $6 Million, Judge Rules

Alejandro Sanz
Alexander Tamargo/Getty Images

Alejandro Sanz is seen performing during his "La Gira" tour concert at the American Airlines Arena on Sept. 7, 2019 in Miami.

The Spanish pop superstar held accountable in breach of contract case, according to attorneys' documents obtained by Billboard.

BARCELONA

— A judge has ruled that Spanish pop superstar Alejandro Sanz must pay his former manager over €5.4 million euros (nearly $6 million) for breach of contract, Billboard has learned.

According to attorneys’ documents obtained by Billboard, Rosa Lagarrigue, who represented Sanz for 25 years until he abruptly ended their relationship in 2016, has won the breach of contract lawsuit she filed in Spanish court.

The court judge, who returned his decision on Sept. 9, ruled that Sanz is responsible for breaking the contract and must pay the damages to Lagarrigue's company, RLM Producciones, compounded by interest, for loss of earnings and other damages.. The decision, however can be appealed.  

Lagarrigue had called the break-up "completely one-sided," and said that she and Sanz had recently renewed their contract when she received a written communication that she would no longer represent him. "At the time," she told El Pais that filing the lawsuit, "the saddest thing I have done in my career."

According tp El Pais and other media sources, Sanz had previously offered Lagarrigue a large settlement through his lawyers, which she rejected.

Sanz and his production company Gazul Productions were named in the lawsuit.

A spokesperson for Sanz’s current representatives, MOW Management, told Billboard on Monday (Sept. 16) that niether they nor Sanz had any comment to make about the decision. A spokesperson for Universal Music, Sanz’s label, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Sanz is currently on tour in the United States.


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