Chayanne Explains Staying Fit On Tour & Why the Show Must Go On

'En Todo Estare' tour kicks off Aug. 1 in Miami.

After touring Latin America for the better part of the year, Puerto Rican superstar Chayanne will finally kick off his U.S. arena tour Aug. 1 at the American Airlines Arena in Miami.

The En Todo Estaré tour, named after Chayanne’s latest studio set, will play in 17 cities through Sept.13, including Los Angeles, New York (Madison Square Garden), Boston, Houston and Chicago. Chayanne, who’s been performing pretty much nonstop for the better part of the year, spoke with Billboard about his tour prep work, about the “parallel” existences he lives while on the road and about (hardly) ever cancelling a show.

You’ve been touring like a mad man. How do you keep your sanity?

In between trips, I come home as much as I can. I recharge, and I try to lead this parallel life. I came back from Central America for a day and a half, and went t  Panama the next day, for example. And I’m happy, even though the conditions aren’t always what one would like. Most of the shows are indoors, but the other day I had to perform outside during a tropical storm. It was supposed to be dry season, but we got this torrential rain. And when that happens, you go with the flow and do the best you can under the circumstances. These tours are long. They last a year and a half and we go to 15 countries. We’re lucky to do that, but it requires a lot of logistics.

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Your show is massive. What do you do when you have torrential rain? Do you ever cancel?

I played a show recently in Honduras in a baseball stadium. And it was packed despite the rain. People came from all over the country and stood in line for hours. I can’t cancel, unless it’s a security issue. Maybe we’re more careful when we dance! [he laughs] But for me to cancel a show, truly, it has to be a natural disaster or some terrible health issue, like years ago, when I got salmonella.

How do you prepare for a tour like this?

I prepare physically before, during and after. I work on my choreography more immediately before the tour. But everything else is a constant. It’s a way of life. I work out. I eat well. During the tour, it’s more intense. I do a combined very intense workout for an hour. I run. And in my room I work out with bands to stretch and tone. I train so I can feel good on stage.

Tell me about the show. Will the U.S. tour be different from Latin America?

It’s the same show everywhere. We rehearse for a performance that can travel from New York to Buenos Aires to Mexico City. We have songs from the new album, and old tracks with great arrangements that keep their essence. The first single was “Humanos a Marte." We sing an urban/pop hybrid with graphics playing in the back that were designed specifically for this show.

Do you see a difference between your audience in Latin America and the U.S.?

The difference is that instead of Spanish, you hear English. The difference is over there they know me since I’m 10 years old. But for me, they’re the same. They sing, they dance, they have a great time. Although in Latin America I play stadiums, and when you can stand in front of 50,000 people at a place like River Plate Stadium, well, that’s a beautiful thing.