Julio Iglesias Is Back With First Spanish Single in 12 Years, 'Fallaste Corazón': Listen

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Julio Iglesias performs 'Julio Iglesias In Concert At Gran Teatre del Liceu' In Barcelona on July 4, 2012 in Barcelona, Spain.  

The nostalgia sentiment has really paid off for many artists recently, whether it’s releasing an album of their own hits with a new spin, (á la Juan Gabriel with Los Dúo), or paying tribute to the classics of others (a la Cristian Castro with his three albums in homage to José José).

Now Julio Iglesias, also known as the most successful Latin singer of all time, is entering the nostalgia business with his upcoming album, Mexico – Julio Iglesias, in which he’ll interpret 12 standards from the country’s golden-era songbook.

For his first single, Iglesias offers up “Fallaste Corazón” (You Failed, Dear), by the prolific Mexican songwriter Cuco Sánchez. Many icons have done their own interpretation of the classic, including Rocio Durcal and Pedro Infante. Here, Iglesias reclaims his title as the world's smoothest balladeer.

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Iglesias’ forthcoming album, due Sept. 18, is his first Spanish-language recording in 12 years. The Madrid-born crooner first performed in Mexico in the ‘70s, conquering the largest Spanish-speaking market and then going on to sell more than 300 million records worldwide by recording in as many as 12 languages. Still, Mexico holds a special place in his heart. In fact, this is his second tribute album to a country that was instrumental to his career, the first of which came in 1976. 

“Mexico is a country that I love dearly,” said Iglesias in a statement. “The Mexican people have given me many indelible moments in my life. I know this country as if it was my homeland, and I always carry it in my soul. This record is dedicated to the outstanding composers who, generation after generation, filled our lives with love, nostalgia, memories and moments. After all these years, they remain alive in our souls.”