Vote for Your Favorite K-Pop/Latin Collaboration: J-Hope & Becky G, Super Junior & Reik, More

Courtesy of Big Hit Entertainment
Becky G and J-Hope

Who knew that a melding melody between K-pop and Latin music would go together like peanut butter and jelly? A few Korean and Latin artists have already begun a trend that fuses both musical styles and features bilingual lyrics. 

Most recently, BTS member J-Hope recruited Mexican-American songstress Becky G for a head-bopping, hip-shaking remake of the 2006 hit “Chicken Noodle Soup.” But before J and Becky collaborated, there were a couple of acts who got together for some sizzling K-pop/Latin joints. 

Check them out and vote for your favorite below. 

J-Hope & Becky G

Becky G, who has collaborated with tons of artists from different genres, joined forces with K-pop sensation J-Hope of BTS to drop “Chicken Noodle Soup.” Their first-ever collab is a trilingual bop (Korean, Spanish and English) that samples the party hit with the same title released originally by Webstar, Young B and the Voice of Harlem in 2006.

Super Junior & Leslie Grace

Super Junior dipped their toes into the Latin music industry in 2018, blessing fans with a Spanish-language single titled “Lo Siento” featuring Dominican singer, Leslie Grace in April. The song combines an infectious melody of Latin urban, Spanish flamenco, and electronic dance music. Grace joins SJ in the music video that currently amasses over 62 million views.

Super Junior & Reik

With the mission of becoming the first K-Pop group to break the cultural barrier, SJ dropped another Latin track called “One More Time (Otra Vez)” with Mexican group Reik in October. The song debuted at No. 5 on the Latin Pop Digital Song Sales chart, moving 1,000 downloads in the week ending Oct. 11, according to Nielsen Music.

CD9 & Crayon Pop

Thinking ahead in the future, Mexican boy band CD9 collaborated with Korean girl group Crayon Pop back in 2016. The two groups dropped “Get Dumb,” an all-English pop track about going out with friends and partying all night out. At the beginning of the track, the Mexican group belts: “A future sound is gonna change a generation,” hinting at the K-Pop/Latin trend.

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