Snoop Dogg Unveils 'The Tanqueray TEN' Influencer Program, Talks Creating 'Coolaid' Film

Courtesy of Tanqueray
Snoop Dogg as a brand ambassador Tanqueray.

Snoop Dogg is ushering “Gin and Juice” into 2017. Though it’s been 24 years since the Doggfather released his seminal debut album Doggystyle, in November 1993, the veteran rapper has just partnered with Tanqueray as a brand ambassador, curating a new influencer program “The Tanqueray TEN” that assembled a select group of musicians and personalities at Los Angeles’ Cicada Club for a photo shoot earlier in January.

While at the shoot for the campaign, the suit-clad MC was joined by his influencer appointees, including Ty Dolla $ign, Lalah Hathaway, Terrence J and more. “Tanqueray has always been good to me and we never really had a working relationship,” said Snoop after the shoot at a roundtable with select journalists. “I would order bottles and they would look out for me because of what I'd said on my song and whatnot. So I never had a relationship with them, and once their people got at my peoples, we forged a relationship and there were things we wanted to do to enhance it.”

Members of the media sipped on a drink called "The Laid Back," which consists of one part Tanqueray Ten, one part Ciroc Apple Vodka, two parts pineapple and topped with soda. "They got great behind-the-scenes people who work at Tanqueray who make suggestions, who give me ideas and work with me, and they gave me suggestions that they coulda, woulda, shoulda, and we came up with the idea being that it's all up under the same umbrella," he explained, adding why he decided to cross gin with Diddy’s brand of vodka. "And then Puffy is one of my closest friends, so he don't mind me giving his drink more play."

Attention naturally soon turned to music, as Snoop reflected on his 14th studio album Coolaid, one that he thought was “mishandled by the record label,” eOne Music, upon release in July 2016. Instead of working on a new solo LP, he’s keeping the promotional flame alive for Coolaid with an accompanying film "to help people better understand where I was coming from," expected to impact in March. "I think it was so much repetition in records when my record came out that everything sounded the same," he said, adding, “that this was a record that didn't sound the same. So it was not in the same vein." He also revealed that he’s been working on new music with his new signee October London and daughter Cori Broadus, as well as a pair of albums from Morris Day and Bootsy Collins, the latter of which will be entirely written by London.

“[London] wrote it from a different perspective of what Boosy sound like,” he said. “It's like, ooh wee. It's so in pocket. Sometimes, when you have a writer writing for you, they're better for you because you forget what you sound like and you forget what you supposed to be sounding like, and someone from the outside perspective can always give you a better vision. Even myself, I have a lot of people to write for me, because it's not that I'm stuck or brain-boggled or can't get it together. It's just sometimes the perspective from the outside is better than your perspective."

Before cutting the roundtable short, Snoop did have some parting words to share about the perfect cocktail. "Pink Panties," he said. "I don't think they make those no more. When I was in junior high school going into high school, that was the drink that the little hot girls used to make when they wanted to act like they wanted to give you a shot at the title but they never gave you none. They made that drink and it made you all revved up, and then, you wouldn't even get a shot at the title.”


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