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A$AP Rocky Clarifies Controversial Comments About Black Lives on The Breakfast Club

A$AP Rocky
Antonio de Moraes Barros Filho/WireImage

A$AP Rocky attends the Raf Simons/Sterling Ruby Menswear Fall/Winter 2014-2015 Show as part of Paris Fashion Week. 

A$AP Rocky clarified his controversial remarks about black lives from a 2015 interview with Time Out in a recent sit-down with Power 105.1's The Breakfast Club. While paying a visit to Angela Yee, DJ Envy and Charlamagne Tha God, the Harlem MC offered, "I feel like that whole interview was taken out of context."

When asked in the Time Out feature about possibly being forced to address political subjects, Rocky said at the time, "They're not forcing me to do shit. I'm just gonna stay black and die. Why, because I'm black? So every time something happens because I'm black I gotta stand up? What the fuck am I, Al Sharpton now? I'm A$AP Rocky. I did not sign up to be no political activist. I wanna talk about my motherfuckin' lean, my best friend dying, the girls that come in and out of my life, the jiggy fashion that I wear, my new inspirations in drugs! I don't wanna talk about no f--king Ferguson and shit because I don't live over there! I live in fucking Soho and Beverly Hills. I can't relate. I'm in the studio; I'm in these fashion studios; I'm in these bitches' drawers. I'm not doing anything outside of that. That's my life." He also caught flack for his 2015 talk at Oxford University where he said about police brutality protests, "I have been recording an album in London for a year, so I really wasn't there [protesting] so I can't speak about it." 

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Return to the present-day and the A$AP Mob member had this to say about his response: "I feel terrible as a black man, as an American. It's crazy. This Donald Trump shit... I just don't understand how they keep saying a dark-skinned n---a don't like black people."

He continued, "And it's because you do these interviews with European reporters, journalists who want to make a name for themselves and they take the shit out of context. Most people who read that interview only read that section based off of what was floating around in the blogs. I feel like, for the most part, people didn't really dissect that interview. You could see that that's not my context." 

"Your favorite rappers today -- I don't know if it's [Young] Thug, Future, Drake, anybody -- you don't always hear their content being about the political shit going on or all the other shit. I feel like why put me on a pedestal for that, especially when I'm not asking for that? I want to make music, I want to inspire, I want to promote peace because at a time like this, I don't have all the answers. I'm not trying to run for Congress or office. I don't have all the answers. I want to promote prosperity especially for black people, especially for just young people, ambitious people, underprivileged. I'm not here to talk about supremacy, who's dominant. It's f--ked up." 

Rocky continues to weigh in on the loss of black lives, the fashion industry being perceived as "racist," dealing with a personal loss each time he releases an album, dating outside of his race and more in the full interview below. 

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